Author Topic: Stephen Hawkin is not on the sick.  (Read 9974 times)

Yvette

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Stephen Hawkin is not on the sick.
« on: 01 Aug 2013 10:05PM »
GP Dr Phil Peverley urges ministers to strip GPs of role in signing sick notes.  He says perfectly healthy people are ‘hell bent’ on proving they are too ill to find a job.

In a strongly-worded critique of the welfare system, Dr Phil Peverley said he had grown so frustrated with the ‘disgruntled unworking well’ he had considered putting a picture of Professor Stephen Hawking in his surgery with a sign reading: ‘This bloke is not on the sick.’

Stephen Hawking, (of whom I am a great fan) is a millionaire and has really good twenty-four hour care.  Yes, brain work can be just as tiring and can wear you out just as much as physical work, but he doesn't have to get himself up and out to work five days a week answering telephones in a call centre to earn his living -  as the government seems to suggest all disabled people are capable of).

Using Stephen Hawking as an example to demonstrate that all disabled people are capable of working, is not only very unfair to Stephen Hawking but unfair to all disabled people.

Click Here For Link

http://www.newsuk24.com/news/stephen-hawking-isn-t-on-the-sick-fed-up-gp-hits-out-at-healthy-patients-hell-bent-on-proving-they-are-too-ill-to-work/related

KizzyKazaer

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Re: Stephen Hawkin is not on the sick.
« Reply #1 on: 01 Aug 2013 10:10PM »
Oh no, the dreaded Stephen Hawking Comparison Game again  >doh< <yawwwwnnnn> and by a 'professional' who should know better too - when will this hoary old chestnut finally be cracked once and for all, it seems to re-appear at regular intervals (is this GP on a secret payroll of IDS et al?)

NeuralgicNeurotic

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Re: Stephen Hawkin is not on the sick.
« Reply #2 on: 01 Aug 2013 10:25PM »
Actually, it's worse that that. Here's the original article Peverley wrote for 'Pulse'

http://www.pulsetoday.co.uk/home/peverley

Quote
Normally when I’m on my summer holiday the phone is off, the TV is never on, newspapers remain in the rack, and the outside world and I amicably break all contact for a few weeks. We can do without each other, for a short period at least.

However, in the car on my current jaunt, while changing one Goon Show CD for another, I accidentally turned on the radio and heard two pieces of vital information.

First, we have a new heir to the throne; a baby boy, who at that point remained unnamed. I took the opportunity to dash down to the bookies in Shetland and get five quid each way on ‘Keith’, while the odds were still long. By the time you read this we’ll probably know for sure; I confidently expect to clean up on that one.

The second item that accidentally got through my firewall was that Atos, that paragon of common sense and private enterprise, will as of next year lose its monopoly on quizzing unemployed disabled people to assess their suitability for work.

The Government’s audit found as many as 41% of Atos’s written reports on disability claims were flawed. But in my experience – although it is unfashionable to say so – Atos nearly always gets it right.

These fitness-to-work assessments – under Atos, and under anyone who takes the role for that matter – generate a massive amount of work in general practice. Entire surgeries could be filled with the disgruntled unworking well, full of indignation at being considered reasonably healthy.

An irresistible force is meeting an unmovable object here, and we are caught in the middle. We are, as a profession, dedicated to making our patients as healthy as possible, and yet a proportion of punters are hell bent on trying to prove they’re really ill, and need us to confirm it. This is a paradox we face daily. The fact is, nearly everyone is capable of some kind of work. I had considered, at one point, putting up a portrait of Professor Stephen Hawking in my consulting room with a caption that said ‘This bloke is not on the sick’.

Being found fit for some kind of employment by Atos does not mean you’re necessarily capable of being an FBI agent or a lumberjack. However, you might be able to work at a desk on a telephone, or hold a lollipop on a zebra crossing. And we all know, without any shadow of a doubt, that any form of regular employment is not only financially beneficial but also leads to less depression, greater social contact, increased well being, a decreasing tendency to addiction and social deprivation, and an increased likelihood of being in a stable relationship.

So it may be bye-bye to Atos, and if so good luck to whatever new organisation takes over. I have only one request; try to keep general practice out of it. The dilemma of constantly dealing with requests to confirm illnesses that I have already sorted out is wasting far too much time and muddying the doctor/patient relationship. Take sickness certification away from us. We are too close.

Pardon my language, but bloody hell!

I can appreciate the frustration felt by GPs, but talk about putting the boot into the wrong people. The horrible mess of a system we're all having to deal with, and the massive workload its generating for GPs is hardly the fault of sick and disabled people who have to reply on benefits!!

The comments are for subscribers only, but I really hope he's being roundly told to get stuffed. And I hope that Stephen Hawking tells him something rather stronger than that!

lankou

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Jockice

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Re: Stephen Hawkin is not on the sick.
« Reply #4 on: 01 Aug 2013 11:08PM »
I'd love to see me working as a lollipop man.

devine63

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Re: Stephen Hawkin is not on the sick.
« Reply #5 on: 01 Aug 2013 11:48PM »
Why are some people too stupid to realise that it is a matter of luck (for Stephen) that he happens to work in a field where he can do a large part of his work - his thinking - anywhere and anywhen (e.g. during the hours of personal care he has to endure) and where some very special assistive technology has been developed which allows him to convert those thoughts into work outputs (scientific articles and books) relatively well.

Many of the rest of us are not that lucky and our job is not so easily adapted to our personal circumstances and our skills are not easily transferred into a different job!

I have emailed the Royal College of General Practitioners to ask them to publish a comment on the article.
regards, Deb

Sunny Clouds

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Re: Stephen Hawkin is not on the sick.
« Reply #6 on: 02 Aug 2013 12:23AM »
Sorry, I feel a rant coming on.

When I go online, I read various things doctors write.  I read doctors' blogs, comments, FB pages etc.  There's a lot of disgruntlement among GPs.  The pressures have piled on, they get all the flak over out of hours care, which legally they have no control over, and they get flak over people turning up to A&E unnecessarily. 

But amids all the whinging by GPs online, whether done seriously or comically, (and I enjoy a good giggle over the composite funny patients some write about) I rarely read anything supporting their patients.

An old fashioned GP was an advocate for their patients.  Before the NHS unless they were a snobby GP to very high class people, it was the done thing to run little ad hoc insurance schemes, so much a week, for the less well off and to write off the fees of those who couldn't afford it.

They spoke up.

And now all too many don't.

Local Medical Committees all round the country are, one by one, telling their member GPs not to help patients with benefits applications and appeals and with housing applications and appeals.  God knows what else more and more are saying they won't help with.

GPs are powerful.  For all that many are overworked, they are very, very well off.  Ok, so a GP trainee/registrar or a new associate or temp GP might be on 'only' £50k, but that rises and the average is over £100k.  My own GP is on more than three times that.

They are among the most intelligent, articulate, educated, respected people in our community.  They meet with people of all social classes and ages.

And the bastards should speak up for us.

Because when GPs don't, you know you're in trouble.  Deep sh*t.


(I'm an obsessive problem-solver, so feel free to ignore any suggestions or solutions I offer, even if they sound terribly insistent.)

james-1989

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Re: Stephen Hawkin is not on the sick.
« Reply #7 on: 02 Aug 2013 12:37AM »
Good grief is there ever an end to the ignorance towards disability. I would imagine Steven Hawkins would find the GP's view ridiculous and offensive.

devine63

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Re: Stephen Hawkin is not on the sick.
« Reply #8 on: 02 Aug 2013 12:53AM »
great rant, Sunny!

More than 20 years post-graduation and working full time I am still not earning £50K per annum which is the starting salary you just cited for a GP (and my training was actually longer than a GP's).

In what way is putting patients into a financially damaging state and increasing their stress levels by refusing to help with applications and appeals "doing no harm"?
regards, Deb

Sunny Clouds

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Re: Stephen Hawkin is not on the sick.
« Reply #9 on: 02 Aug 2013 01:28AM »
It isn't. 

Gosh, I feel another rant coming on.

Pre-NHS GP in industrial town.  His patients don't have brilliant health.  He knows a lot won't live to old age.  But he looks after them as best he can and tries to persuade the factory/mill/pit owner to have regard to the odd bit of health and safety and when they're not in work he puts them in touch with the parish for some money.  He probably doesn't like them having to sell every last thing they have, right down to the wedding ring, to get help from the parish, but he does what he can.

Current GP.  He's benefitted from the welfare state.  Now he can make loads of money even if he works in one of the deprived areas that used to be in the heartlands of manual work, with work for as many as could do it.  He doesn't have to let his income drop a bit to help the poorer people of the parish.  Instead of feeling good about this, he sneers at them for their big television and cigarettes and fat bodies.  He's probably never done the maths on the relative costs of fresh potatoes and frozen chips.  He's probably never done the maths on his nice wine and meals out versus their beer and fags. 

He could do like my GP does and employ someone to help them with stuff like benefits, like better-off calculations, and a practice counsellor to bypass the long mental health trust waiting lists.  No, that costs too much. 

But he knows his patients don't try hard enough to get jobs.  Surely oiks like that can find work, can't they? The jobs are there if they try hard enough.  They don't want to work, though and so what if the jobs available locally are zero hours?  What's a zero hours contract anyway?  It's only like agency work, all you've got to do is turn up and there'll be work there for you.

But they're lazy and if that weren't bad enough, they want to be signed off sick.  It's to get extra money.  For God's sake, can't they manage on £71/week plus most of their rent paid?  Surely he managed that when he was a student, didn't he?  Well, ok, he qualified in the days when there were full grants, but even so.

And the kids.  Look at those fat slobs that come in pushing out more kids.  They say they're depressed because the father walked out, but who wouldn't when they're chavvy slobs?  If they got a job for a few years and worked hard they could afford to have kids.  Childcare isn't that expensive is it?  They don't have to have a nanny like his kids. 

They come out with all that crap about having a baby because they want someone to love them, to value them.  They should get off their arses, stop eating chips, work hard until they've got a decent salary and then someone would love them. 

Because sure as hell, he doesn't.  He doesn't love anyone.  He certainly doesn't love his job.  He resents how much he's paying into his pension but he can't wait to quite work and draw it so he doesn't have to deal with these lazy cows who can't get off their arses and do these so-called zero hours contracts or live off £71/week minus the gap between their housing benefit and their rent.

(I'm not talking about my GP.  I don't know if he loves his patients: either he does or his a good actor.  Probably doesn't make much difference if he heals and helps them.)
(I'm an obsessive problem-solver, so feel free to ignore any suggestions or solutions I offer, even if they sound terribly insistent.)

Dic Penderyn

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Re: Stephen Hawkin is not on the sick.
« Reply #10 on: 02 Aug 2013 08:16AM »
Quote
More than 20 years post-graduation and working full time I am still not earning £50K per annum

Crazy world isn't it recently found out that my nephew as an executive consultant for Atos consulting was on £62k plus bonuses at age about 26 and all he has is a degree in economics.

Be careful in what you wish for, God has a sense of humour

Yvette

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Re: Stephen Hawkin is not on the sick.
« Reply #11 on: 02 Aug 2013 08:40AM »
Quote
I have emailed the Royal College of General Practitioners to ask them to publish a comment on the article.
regards, Deb

Well done, Deb.  >star<

Articles like those of Dr 'Down With Disabled People' whip up hatred of disabled people and make us all look as if we workshy and are fiddling benefits.  >angry<

I wish I could go out to work but I can't.

Fizzbw

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Re: Stephen Hawkin is not on the sick.
« Reply #12 on: 02 Aug 2013 11:42AM »
There are some very good GP's. there are some hideously dreadful GP's. There are both at my surgery. Unfortunately the bad ones are more usually the permanent ones. One Dr always has free appointments, very few people will see him. A friend of mine sees him. He's had a patch of sun damage on his ear for 10 years. Only now is the GP doing a biopsy....He's also had him on a myriad of antidepressants for nearly 20 years with no counselling or visit with a consultant. I saw him once as he was down as my GP (after our wonderful real family Dr retired) and I was trying to get HCW to agree to fund DBS for me. He pressed me into telling him just how dreadful the pain was, then sat their smugly and said that actually he couldn't recommend surgery as evidence showed that people who had positive mental attitudes did better after surgery than those who didnt....when one spends all ones time thinking positively this was infuriating.

What I Find really wrong is the pay that hospital doctors get wrt GP's. it's not even comparable and plain wrong. My BIL is a consultant Obstetritian and gets a very poor salary in comparison, and he works a lot harder and has a far greater level on knowledge. People say that GP's have to know everything but in my case I rarely see a GP who knows much, if anything about my condition. Although a saw a baby GP yesterday who did, and had actually read my notes bless him.

Fx

JLR2

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Re: Stephen Hawkin is not on the sick.
« Reply #13 on: 02 Aug 2013 03:45PM »
"And we all know, without any shadow of a doubt, that any form of regular employment is not only financially beneficial but also leads to less depression"

Perhaps, if such employment pays enough in the way of wage earnings to allow someone to meet their bills and ends the nightmare of awaiting the next postman's delivery of bill bearing mail.

JLR2

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Re: Stephen Hawkin is not on the sick.
« Reply #14 on: 02 Aug 2013 03:49PM »
"GP Dr Phil Peverley urges ministers to strip GPs of role in signing sick notes.  He says perfectly healthy people are ‘hell bent’ on proving they are too ill to find a job"

Just as this government are 'Hell bent' on proving the dying are fit to work.