Author Topic: Chat about anti-depressants  (Read 12599 times)

Fiz

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Re: Chat about anti-depressants
« Reply #15 on: 06 Jun 2013 08:26AM »
Feeling angry and irritable are often part of anxiety, do you feel that way when anxious Auntie? They can be side effects of SSRI's too but apparently that wears off as you acclimatise.

I feel irritable and angry when anxious but tend to internalise it so no one else knows but it tends to lead me on a downward spiral mood wise to despair and hopelessness, and like you I end up not liking myself at all. Wish I knew what to do with it that is healthier and less destructive.

devine63

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Re: Chat about anti-depressants
« Reply #16 on: 06 Jun 2013 08:41AM »
Hi Fiz

I'm not expert in this stuff, but I wonder if it is possible to "think through" an episode of anxiety / irritation / anger in some way?
Perhaps you could ask yourself questions like:

who / what am I anxious about?
who am I angry with?
is there evidence (e.g. a trigger) which makes that anxiety / anger a reasonable reaction right now?

If yes: what can I do to change the situation so I can get away from what makes me anxious or make it go away from me?  Or is there some way to remove the cause of the anger?

If no: if there is no evidence of something immediate causing the anxiety / anger then what else might be causing it?   e.g. could a hormonal change be affecting you?  Or is there something else which might explain it?

Even if there isn't any apparent explanation, can you think of it something like "ok, right now I'm experiencing a period of unexplainable anxiety / anger, but I know from past experience that if I just wait for a few hours / days / weeks that feeling will go away by itself ....  so what can I do to help myself to pass that time?"  e.g.  could you distract yourself with a puzzlebook or do something soothing like make yourself a cup of tea?  (I find the ritual of that soothing, maybe you have other things which have that effect for you?)

I may be completely off track, but maybe you can adapt this to suit you.
regards, Deb

Yvette

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Re: Chat about anti-depressants
« Reply #17 on: 06 Jun 2013 02:11PM »
I wish I could distract myself. Because before I even realise it, I have gone off like a rocket. 

There is no interval in which to think - I react immediately. It is instant.

seegee

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Re: Chat about anti-depressants
« Reply #18 on: 06 Jun 2013 02:11PM »
I'm currently taking mirtazapine and amitriptyline; amitriptyline makes me sleepy (as it's meant to). 

It's hard to comment on side-effects as my current mix includes anti-inflammatory, painkiller, immunosuppressant, topical treatments and other drugs including omeprazole to reduce gut-ache from the rest - that's the only long-lasting side-effect so far though; they don't seem to be successful at making me feel sick, altering my weight, making me overly drowsy (except amitriptyline; as noted above, that's what it's for). 
I haven't had any particular problem with mirtazapine though (no dry mouth, no weight or appetite change) and it seems to be helping keep depression at a distance. 

Mabelcat

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Re: Chat about anti-depressants
« Reply #19 on: 06 Jun 2013 05:24PM »
I awaiting a medication review at the moment but am continuing to take real-time which I originally took as an adjunct to revitalize to help with sleep.  It is an atypical tricyclic and as well as helping with sleep it is supposed to have some impact on pain.  It's not much used but might be worth a go.  I have never felt especially side effected on it.

auntieCtheM

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Re: Chat about anti-depressants
« Reply #20 on: 06 Jun 2013 11:52PM »
Mabelcat, I have never heard of real-time.  It sounds like a new cinema technology.  >biggrin<  What is an atypical tricyclic - sorry, I'm off to bed in a few minutes and I've been a bit cross for the last couple of hours so do not feel like wading through google to look it up.

Hi Fiz, no I do not get anxious.  It is like Yvette was saying - I get a sudden explosion.  There is no time to think anything through, just pow!  This is so unlike my normal behaviour.  I am brilliant in a crisis, I never get flustered and am cool and calm and collected.  This sudden explosion is really weird.

Thanks Yvette for saying that you get this too.  Do you get it all the time, or do your anti-d's help?  When my anti-d's are working I do not get the anger part.


Today the wanting to eat all the time has lessened - only I do comfort eat.  Because I got angry over something really small earlier, what did I do - I headed straight for the cupboard to get something to eat.  Oh dear.  I have already put on some weight and it is only 4 or 5 days.  I had to go out today and noticed my profile reflected in a shop window.  That was a bit of a shock I can tell you.   >lol<

Mabelcat

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Re: Chat about anti-depressants
« Reply #21 on: 07 Jun 2013 12:25AM »
The perils of auto correct.  It's trazodone as an adjunct to escitalopram which helps me sleep.  Otherwise what I said was right.

Yvette

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Re: Chat about anti-depressants
« Reply #22 on: 07 Jun 2013 08:24AM »
Do you get it all the time, or do your anti-d's help?  When my anti-d's are working I do not get the anger part.

I get it all the time.  Even though I am now on two antidepressants together. 

The anti-depressants make no difference whatsoever.  :-(

auntieCtheM

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Re: Chat about anti-depressants
« Reply #23 on: 07 Jun 2013 08:59PM »
Oh dear, Yvette.  I presume that you have tried different brands of the types you are taking.

Yvette

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Re: Chat about anti-depressants
« Reply #24 on: 08 Jun 2013 07:08PM »
Yes, and it makes no difference.  It is Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. 

I have been waiting two years for therapy and have to wait another year before I can be put on next year's waiting list.  If someone needs it more than me, I will have to wait until the following year.  :-(

auntieCtheM

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Re: Chat about anti-depressants
« Reply #25 on: 08 Jun 2013 08:08PM »
Yvette, Maybe we can think up something you can do that makes them think you need the therapy now.   ;-)

I must make that appointment with the GP asap.  These pills do not seem to be working as anti-depressants should.  I slept for 17 hours last night, and I can feel myself sliding down the slippery slope.  I am not a happy bunny.

Yvette

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Re: Chat about anti-depressants
« Reply #26 on: 09 Jun 2013 08:21AM »
A GP appointment as soon as poss is a good idea.   >thumbsup<

auntieCtheM

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Re: Chat about anti-depressants
« Reply #27 on: 09 Jun 2013 06:58PM »
Does anyone know why anti-depressants have such a wide range of side effects.   On me they are both physical and mental.


I am in a right old state today, and I know it is the anti-d's.  They are making me very depressed!!  It is a long time since I have walked around the house crying all the time.  The amount of sleep I am having every night is ridiculous too.  And last night I had to take some painkillers in the middle of the night as well as extra ones during the day - that has not happened for a long time.  It is obvious that these, (and other side effects I have not mentioned 'cos it would be far too boring to list them), are all side effects of the new anti-d's.

So I have decided to try taking half a tablet tonight, so see if that helps a bit.  Honestly, the pills are making me worse than the thing they are supposed to be curing.

I'll go to the GP's tomorrow to get an appointment, but I expect that will mean a 10 day wait.

Looks like I have joined the same club that Fiz is in - see her list above.

devine63

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Re: Chat about anti-depressants
« Reply #28 on: 09 Jun 2013 08:47PM »
Hi Auntie

why do anti-depressants have such a wide range of side effects?
Technical answer coming up - others may want to just skip over this post.

The brain and spinal cord (together they are the central nervous system) and the peripheral nervous system (the nerves throughout the rest of the body) together are connected to every organ and tissue in your body.  They work using a combination of "electrical" impulses which travel along the length of the nerves and "chemical" signals which bridge the tiny gap (synapse) between one nerve cell and the next one.   The electrical impulses can travel fast or slow and sometimes they get interrupted or slowed down by something (e.g. multiple sclerosis strips the fatty sheath off of the nerves and that slows down the nerve impulses so the nerves don't work very well).  The chemical signals are called neurotransmitters (NTs) and one of the explanations for some kinds of neurological and psychiatric conditions is that the body has either too much or too little of one or other of the neurotransmitters.  e.g. encephalitis lethargica and Parkinson's disease both involve the neurotransmitter called Dopamine.

Doctors have so far identified more than 100 substances which appear to function as neurotransmitters at least some of the time.   We only know the precise actions of a few of them, we know very little as yet about how these chemicals interact with one another (e.g. it seems likely that some are linked so that when levels of AA are high, levels of BB go low ...) so our understanding of brain function is still very limited.

There are a few NTs (e.g. serotonin, dopamine and norepinephrin (aka noradrenalin)) which appear to have something to do with depression (or at least when their levels are too high or too low it is quite likely the patient is depressed but this may not be a direct effect, it could be they are just part of a chain of NTs involved in depression).   So most anti-depressant drugs try to target the amount of one or other of these 3 NTs in the nervous system - either by getting the  body to produce more of the NT or by "mopping up" any excess of the NT or by making the nerve cell grow more receptor cells for that specific NT so that the cell becomes more sensitive to the NT.

So when you take an anti-depressant it affects all of the nerve cells all around your body which use that particular NT.  Depending on what that particular nerve cell does, it can cause the cell's function to change - causing a wide range of possible effects in different systems and organs - and of course those effects might not be immediate and obvious, they might subtly affect some complicated process which can disturb quite major processes.  Hence all kinds of side effects ...

regards, Deb

auntieCtheM

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Re: Chat about anti-depressants
« Reply #29 on: 09 Jun 2013 09:24PM »
Oh thank you Devine.  It does help to know the reasons why things are like they are. 

Presumably lots of research is going on to find out more about how things interact and to find more targeted anti-d's. 

It took some time for me to agree to take anti d's, and the explanation was always that there is a chemical imbalance in my brain that the pills would sort this out.  It is very obvious to me that these particular anti-d's have interfered with my brain's chemical balance and made it even more unbalanced!