Author Topic: Social Services Assessment  (Read 4384 times)

Becca7

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Social Services Assessment
« on: 03 Dec 2012 04:18PM »
I was wonderng what people could tell me about assessments by social services for both mental and physical health; one has been arranged for tommorow and I am very concerned about it. 

Monic1511

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Re: Social Services Assessment
« Reply #1 on: 03 Dec 2012 07:34PM »
Hi Becca

In my area what normally happens is an occupational therapist visits the client and asks them what sort of problems they are having with personal care issues - washing dressing, eating, meal prep, getting in & out of bed & bath, shower or toileting.
The OT then sees what aids would be reasonable for the person to use & see if they can provide them.
As for mental health assessments - thats more difficult - an OT would possible write a report if they found the remote in the fridge or the person was speaking about their deceased relatives and had forgotten they had died.  An ot would never say on their own that a client was not mentally competent - thats a specialist doctors job. 

Does that help in any way

Best wishes
Monic

ditchdwellers

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Re: Social Services Assessment
« Reply #2 on: 03 Dec 2012 10:49PM »
Hi Becca,

I have an annual assessment from a social worker for my Direct Payments which I use to employ my PAs.  I'm asked what needs I have in terms of dressing, eating, cooking, shopping  and accessing appointments etc.  In England, your needs are assessed and you are placed into a category according to those needs: Moderate, Substantial, and Critical.  My local authority will only pay if you have Substantial and Critical needs, although this varies between councils.  The Social worker then works out a care plan for you, listing the support you need and how much they are prepared to fund you.  You can choose to have carers provided directly via social services, or funding in the form of a Direct Payment which you can use to employ your own PA.

I''ve also had an OT assessment as described by Monic for aids and equipment.

Good luck tomorrow, try to think of things you may need help with.  I need help with dressing and washing safely, and need help to get to the doctors etc.  I also need help with food preparation and eating, as I need someone to cut my food up for me.  I hope this gives you some idea as to what to expect  >hugs<

Becca7

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Re: Social Services Assessment
« Reply #3 on: 04 Dec 2012 12:35PM »
Thanks for help. Part one done. Dont smell enough and not spotty enough to not be washing even though im not washing, havent for months.

Yvette

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Re: Social Services Assessment
« Reply #4 on: 04 Dec 2012 01:36PM »
Sending you lots of positive vibes for a successful outcome.

If you are not washing, have you tried baby wipes?  I find them really useful when I'm not up to showering or washing.  >hugs<

Becca7

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Re: Social Services Assessment
« Reply #5 on: 04 Dec 2012 01:53PM »
I have tried that. Unfortunately i have very sensitive skin, even the sensitive ones caused problems. The OT said should leave county as no help here for people like me :-(

devine63

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Re: Social Services Assessment
« Reply #6 on: 04 Dec 2012 05:58PM »
Nice to see the OT who conducted the assessments is applying a proper, evidence based approach (not!).   Not washing does not necessarily cause spots!   Assuming you cannot use your current bathroom, what does she imagine you are doing to keep clean?   Why should your word not be good enough?
regards, Deb

Becca7

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Re: Social Services Assessment
« Reply #7 on: 04 Dec 2012 09:34PM »
She was quite definite re stinky and spotty, the social worker with her agreed. I dont understand stinky either - i hardly move so dont sweat if ever, spots never been an issue for me, and my hair can go years without a wash and look ok. My word isnt good enough, for anything, i dont really understand why. Thanks for vent space and replies. Appreciated.

Debbie

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Re: Social Services Assessment
« Reply #8 on: 16 Dec 2012 04:20PM »
Make a complaint, if you ask they have to explain how.  Telling you to leave area is clearly shirking responsibility

Fiz

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Re: Social Services Assessment
« Reply #9 on: 18 Dec 2012 07:58AM »
Unfortunately personal care such as washing is a social need not a medical one unless a medical condition requires it, and with the budget cuts such social needs are being placed lower down the needs list and are often no longer deemed a substantial need. They should be noted as a need on the care assessment, but they may not be high enough a need in the current financial climate to be awarded care.

devine63

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Re: Social Services Assessment
« Reply #10 on: 18 Dec 2012 11:28PM »
I'm not sure that's right, Fiz.   Certainly I would argue that it's a human rights issue - I want a shower or bath every day and I believe that is reasonable - after all most other people can have a shower or bath as often as they want!
regards, Deb

neurochick

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Re: Social Services Assessment
« Reply #11 on: 19 Dec 2012 12:57AM »
I know that it instinctively feels as though daily or other regular washing should have a higher priority in care terms but it doesn't.  Fiz is right that washing is a feature of social care and not medical care.  Local authorities don't put as high a priority and importance on daily washing as most average individuals probably would.  Local authorities aren't under a duty to ensure that people are provided with such assistance as would allow them to live in a manner that is comparable to that of people who do not require any assistance. 

devine63

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Re: Social Services Assessment
« Reply #12 on: 19 Dec 2012 01:00AM »
But if a client were to combine the legislative requirements on the local authority to provide Social Care with the right to a private life etc under the Human Rights Act I believe the combination of the two could be used to insist on having whatever level of personal care is appropriate - because the right to dignity is one of the human rights.
regards, Deb

Fiz

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Re: Social Services Assessment
« Reply #13 on: 19 Dec 2012 05:58AM »
I answered that from a position of a care manager, unfortunately what I said is the practice of social services. In the past those with a substantial need would have had those needs met but in order to cope with reduced budgets from Government local authorities have been forced to change criteria for eligibility, and many are only now meeting critical needs and personal care rarely ever meets that criteria.

neurochick

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Re: Social Services Assessment
« Reply #14 on: 19 Dec 2012 07:03AM »
The rights to dignity etc don't provide that people should have exactly the same rights as non disabled people though - the language is all around participation in life and a good standard of living.  I think it would be hard to argue that that equates to an entitlement to whatever any other non assisted person might choose to do as regards frequency of washing.  I might choose to shower once or even twice a day but there are plenty of folk who don't wash every day, they may only shower or bathe every second day for example.  Just my personal view though.