Author Topic: Living with Obesity (BBC news)  (Read 479 times)

ditchdwellers

  • Charter Member
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3222
Living with Obesity (BBC news)
« on: 17 Jun 2021 01:54PM »
There's a really interesting account about living with obesity from one woman's point of view. 
Obesity runs in my family and I'm overweight. I find it exceptionally difficult to loose weight and feel that those of us who have high BMIs (I hate that measure) are unfairly judged by medical professionals and the general public as being cream cake stuffing, benefit scrounging scum unworthy of support or treatment. 

Anyway, here's a link to the article and you can read her thoughts for yourself. 

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-57419041

Sunny Clouds

  • Charter Member
  • Super Hero Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 5319
Re: Living with Obesity (BBC news)
« Reply #1 on: 17 Jun 2021 02:55PM »
My levels of fat, and my weight have varied a lot through my life.

I know that for myself, there are lots of factors, including how fit I am, what I'm eating, how much I'm eating, which medications I'm on etc. 

Back in the '00s, I put on 6 clothing sizes in just a few months on olanzapine, but a few years later, I lost 5 clothing sizes in under 4 months, mostly whilst spent in a psychiatric unit with inadequate food.  (I.e. not deliberate dieting.)  The last time my thyroxine was reduced, I put on a stone in just over two weeks.

I get very ranty about what I'll encapsulate as 'sneeriness' towards fat people. There are so many factors and people who either find it easy to stay slim, or who got fat, got slim and are able to keep it there without impossible effort, often don't want to accept that it's not easy for everyone.

The thing that bugs me most relates to comfort eating (and yes, I comfort eat).  People who get fat are often sneered at as 'greedy'.  Hmm.  So someone eats because it makes them feel good, and end up eating too much like someone else might drink too much or smoke too much etc.  How does being nasty help?  Why wouldn't they go home and pig out to comfort themselves?

But then I worked out a few years back that some people get the same brain chemical kick from sneering and bullying as others do from substances they take into their bodies, whether food or other things.

Also, what about all those that are struggling mentally, get put on obesogenic medication and then get sneered at?  Putting that in perspective, when a cancer charity stuck a big poster next to my local psychiatric unit saying that obesity was a leading cause of cancer, I chucked all my obesogenic antimad pills on the floor and jumped up and down on them, before, in due course, asking my doctor for a fresh prescription.

I see & hear the nastiness it at bus stops and on buses, for example with comments deliberately said loud enough to be overheard by a fat person in sports kit.  Ok, so you want them to lose weight and think it's tied in with lack of exercise, so why shame them when they're dressed for exercise?

So I'm glad articles like that are published.  I would like more, though, that emphasise the multitude of factors involved.

Incidentally, the temperature on the thermometer next to my bed last night was a bit over 24 degrees.  I wore clothes in bed, including socks and gloves, and had a hot water bottle as well as my 13 tog duvet.  It's warm enough out that people are walking past my window in T-shirts and wispy blouses, but I'm wearing a pullover over my long-sleeved top and putting my fingers on my belly, I can tell that my fingers are cold.  How to avoid getting fat if my body doesn't burn the calories?  Yes, I can eat less, but then if my body only uses a percentage of the calories, it'll get even colder.
(I'm an obsessive problem-solver, so feel free to ignore any suggestions or solutions I offer, even if they sound terribly insistent.)

lankou

  • Charter Member
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3102
Re: Living with Obesity (BBC news)
« Reply #2 on: 17 Jun 2021 03:34PM »
I am losing a lot of weight, however it is due to an experimental treatment involving self administered subcutaneous injection in the area of my stomach once a week. I have lost 15kilos since the end of March.

Sunny Clouds

  • Charter Member
  • Super Hero Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 5319
Re: Living with Obesity (BBC news)
« Reply #3 on: 17 Jun 2021 07:58PM »
That sounds interesting.  I hope it proves to be successful long-term.
(I'm an obsessive problem-solver, so feel free to ignore any suggestions or solutions I offer, even if they sound terribly insistent.)

lankou

  • Charter Member
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3102
Re: Living with Obesity (BBC news)
« Reply #4 on: 18 Jun 2021 08:52AM »
That sounds interesting.  I hope it proves to be successful long-term.
So do I, even my GP is surprised at the weight loss, blood pressure decrease, and lipid levels drop. Also my HbA1c readings, (whatever that is has dropped from 84 to 46.)
The only problem is stick to the food instructions given by the specialist nurse or you will spend a day sat on the Thunderbox.  :f_yikes:

Fiz

  • Charter Member
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4450
Re: Living with Obesity (BBC news)
« Reply #5 on: 18 Jun 2021 10:54AM »
Is this treatment for weight loss? Or is the weight loss an unrelated positive of a treatment for something else? It sounds amazingly positive.

lankou

  • Charter Member
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3102
Re: Living with Obesity (BBC news)
« Reply #6 on: 18 Jun 2021 11:14AM »
Is this treatment for weight loss? Or is the weight loss an unrelated positive of a treatment for something else? It sounds amazingly positive.
Not specifically but if you don't do what you are told when it comes to food you will spend a lot of time sat on the toilet.
Basically I have given up bread and cheese, cut down on spuds, and cutting any fat off of cooked meat.

Sunny Clouds

  • Charter Member
  • Super Hero Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 5319
Re: Living with Obesity (BBC news)
« Reply #7 on: 18 Jun 2021 05:21PM »
I find carrots leave my bowels, erm, active.  But they don't seem to cause me to lose weight, sadly.

(Long essay on fat storage and loss and my opinionated views follows...)

I got seriously interested in the whole subject of fat in the body a few years back, though not many, and went through a phase of watching documentaries, talks etc., and reading research and opinions.

That's what left me with my very strongly held opinion that it's multifactorial, that we shouldn't expect one solution to work for everyone.  On the other hand, it's great when different ways of helping people are found.

We know there's been a shift in very recent years in countries such as the UK and US away from "carbs are fine, cut fat" to "fat's fine, cut carbs", often very simplistically expressed.  Sadly, given that I am inclined to believe the theory that the US pushed the cut fats approach hard because in the cold war they wanted their country to be reliant on what they were able to produce best, which was stuff like corn and beef.

That being so, there's big money to be made from oil, so I'm going to be wary as well of any over-simplistic 'carbs are bad' messages as well.

There's also a nice little observation that I came across a few years back that if the popular weight loss organisations such as Weightwatchers (now WW?), Slimmers World, Rosemary Conley worked long-term, they'd go bust because they rely on repeat business.

I do rather like a theory I came across that's accepted more widely now than previously that one major factor in international spread of obesity is to do with gut bicrobiome.  Put in crude terms, the theory is that you can 'catch' obesity as it were.  There is as yet no suggestion that it's a single type of bacteria that does it, but nevertheless researchers have found that if they do gut flora transplants between fat and thin people, the thin people can get fatter and vice-versa. 

Thus one approach for people is to see whether tweaking what they eat less from a calorie perspective, but more from a 'gut flora balance' perspective helps them.  It seems to be a key factor for some not others.  That can include tweaking sugar intake levels as some bacteria seem to like sugar more than others.  Others find things like certain sorts of yoghurt etc. help them.

Incidentally, on the sugar front, modern potatoes are rather different from potatoes that originally spread round the world.  That showed up when researchers analysed remnants of 'lumper' potatoes from Irish famine era and found that the subsistence potatoes were higher in protein than export crop potatoes, which were like our modern supermarket ones. If you think that's accidental, you don't share my sense that big, successful businesses work out what sells well.  Did you ever consider the contrast between paintings of important people in Ancient Rome & Ancient Greece, and more modern ones?  The sugar and tobacco trades flourished around the time Western art started pushing the notion that fatness was beautiful and a sign of wealth and importance.

And I'm now going to sound defensive.  I've been accused by various people in the past of passing on these analyses of how and why some people get fat as an  'excuse' for my own fat.  No.  I admit that I'm a comfort eater, and insofar as I say "But I also have problems with my pituitary signals to my thyroid and with obesogenic medication and I believe that there are general dietary and gut flora issues" that is not to excuse my comfort eating.  It is, however, important when trying to tackle it.  For me personally, as for lots of people, it's about tackling 'both, and' not 'either, or'.

And I will continue to speak out against fat-shaming and also what I'll call poverty-shaming and ignorance-shaming.  Sneering towards what some people like to call 'chavs'.  I remember the point at which someone posed a question that really stuck in my mind.  "If you're struggling financially and you don't have much in the way of cooking facilities, how do you get protein?"  For many people, it's buying this week's special offer from the takeaway.  And when people sneer at them, the question to ask is "How often do takeaways offer salad with those chicken nuggets or pizza or kebab, as opposed to chips?"

I went in a supermarket in a deprived area and out of curiosity checked some prices.  The comparison I remember is that frozen chips, which can be cooked in a microwave, under a grill, in a small countertop oven etc. were much, much cheaper per kilo than fresh potatoes.

I hope I'm not offending anyone.  On another messageboard, I clashed so often with someone else on this that we had to agree not to respond to each other.  I  mentally characterised her as 'sneery' and I think she characterised me as 'making excuses'.  The irony is that we clashed because we both share a very strong view that too much fat of the wrong sort can be very harmful and undesirable.

So if on here I find myself at odds with someone over this, I hope we'll be able to reach a similar compromise.
(I'm an obsessive problem-solver, so feel free to ignore any suggestions or solutions I offer, even if they sound terribly insistent.)

KizzyKazaer

  • Global Moderator
  • Super Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 9018
Re: Living with Obesity (BBC news)
« Reply #8 on: 18 Jun 2021 05:29PM »
.
Quote
..if you don't do what you are told when it comes to food you will spend a lot of time sat on the toilet.
:f_yikes:

Quote
People who get fat are often sneered at as 'greedy'.  Hmm.  So someone eats because it makes them feel good, and end up eating too much like someone else might drink too much or smoke too much etc.  How does being nasty help?  Why wouldn't they go home and pig out to comfort themselves?
As a smoker (another of society's pariahs) and not overweight, I totallhy agree, Sunny!


And yes, the anti-mad pills (anti-psychotics mainly) are known for the weight gain side-effects - wretched things.  I was underweight when started on them so OK, it wasn't such a big deal as it might be for others to put on a few pounds, but all the same..  A little more thought from judgemental people would go a long way.  Still, some get their jollies from criticising others all the time, don't they?  Says more about them, really!

Sunny Clouds

  • Charter Member
  • Super Hero Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 5319
Re: Living with Obesity (BBC news)
« Reply #9 on: 18 Jun 2021 08:12PM »
Quote
Still, some get their jollies from criticising others all the time, don't they?  Says more about them, really!

Ooh, I forgot my favourite rant on that...

It seems to me that pretty much every society I've heard of has accepted some sorts of feelgood substances.  They also accept feelgood activities.  What is acceptable or unacceptable changes over time.

I have a limited everyday understanding of brain chemistry, but with my vague concepts of things like endorphins and dopamine, I have a sense that mostly they work the same way.  Make you feel good, so you want more.

And some people do indeed get their jollies from criticising others.  I really do believe that when it comes to what I'll call substance-addiction and mocking-addiction, it's pretty much the same.

But try telling someone that likes to scorn fat people, especially if they do so on the pretext that fat people are 'greedy', that they are themselves 'greedy' for their 'I'm better than them' kicks and, oh dear...

I'm like anyone.  I like what makes me feel good, and much of what society wouldn't criticise has its harms.

In my teens I was an ardent evangelical Christian, with endless meetings and wailings of Alleluia.  If my parents and the bullying teachers and kids didn't love me, maybe Jesus would.  Then I got hooked on running and other forms of exercise.  That cost the taxpayer money for injuries and worn out joints.

I got a lot of feelgood from volunteering and helping, but a large proportion of it was in the context of being exploited and unappreciated.  That cost me emotionally big time.

And loads of people these days are hooked on 'social media'.  I think I'm hooked on my internet connection, albeit not many messageboards and currently no twitter, facebook, tiktok, whatsapp or whatever.  I message using skype with one long-term internet friend. 

I don't know what the answer is, save that I do know that personally I need to have less fat and more muscle.  I'm currently trying to improve my diet.  I had started eating biscuits again and it's toxic for me.  I buy a packet of biscuits, go home and eat the whole packet in one go.

Then I thought how in the past, I used to treat myself to a pain au chocolat.  So I bought one.  And another.  Then I realised that that brand was twice as big as the ones I used to buy, and anyway, how many calories?  Eeek!

I daren't diet by counting calories - I become obsessed then eat more.  But I'm trying to tell myself which of my treats are higher/lower in calories.  Home truths I don't like.
(I'm an obsessive problem-solver, so feel free to ignore any suggestions or solutions I offer, even if they sound terribly insistent.)

JLR2

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2172
Re: Living with Obesity (BBC news)
« Reply #10 on: 20 Jun 2021 09:01AM »
I've experienced two diets of sorts, one was brought about through my car crash in '89 which saw me in hospital for 7 weeks. For the first six weeks I was being fed mashed turnip through a straw and boy did I lose weight. The second was brought about through a reaction to the break up of a relationship whereby I simply decided to stop eating. It took some friends to become involved and through gentle persuasion guide me back to eating again. My second self imposed diet got to the point that I ended up collapsing whilst waiting for my friend to arrive from the Highlands at Buchanan St bus station.

I could do with losing some weight now, were I not still smoking I don't doubt my weight would be even more of a problem, as things stand I've a bit of a stomach not unlike the regular beer belly though in my case more a coffee belly :f_laugh:    I've never been much so far as regular exercise goes but think my tendency to wear my belts fairly tight has seen my legs stay not much beyond skin and bone with the stomach hanging over it a bit, this and my being sat on my backside way too much. This being planted on the backside might be about to change as I've more things I will be doing so far as my back garden goes, things that'll involve me actually having to put real effort into doing, things involving wheelbarrows and shovels :f_yikes:   As usual I'll probably end up wrecking my elbows/arm and back :f_laugh:

Sunny Clouds

  • Charter Member
  • Super Hero Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 5319
Re: Living with Obesity (BBC news)
« Reply #11 on: 20 Jun 2021 07:39PM »
Getting healthier by doing more things that could do with being done, whilst having the potential to cause problems, can also be positive.  I've realised I don't do enough when it comes to housework, gardening, house maintenance etc. and now I'm trying to tiptoe back into it.
(I'm an obsessive problem-solver, so feel free to ignore any suggestions or solutions I offer, even if they sound terribly insistent.)

ally

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 538
Re: Living with Obesity (BBC news)
« Reply #12 on: 21 Jun 2021 09:25AM »
I’ve lost five stone over the pandemic period, and, haven’t met up with anyone from my bubble since then.  It was done purely for health reasons to ward off diabetes high BP etc that runs through my family.  I’d never push my weight loss down other peoples throats.  However, apart from my woman GP, who asked how I’d achieved my amazing weight loss, to date, hardly any, if any other woman (friends)  have acknowledged it.  I’ve realised that most women see it as a reflection on themselves, and, don’t like it.  I actually think, I could be in danger of losing one friend due to the above.  

I’ve come to the conclusion I’d be more popular if I put the weight back on.   However, I’m not going to do it.  I look better, and, I’m happier In myself than I was when overweight.   It’s a shame that weight gain or loss can cause fat shaming, or, envy with some women in particular.   I’m still the same person, although a thinner version.  Weight gain, or, loss should have no reflection on a persons life.  However, it does, and, rarely is it in a good way.

Sunny Clouds

  • Charter Member
  • Super Hero Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 5319
Re: Living with Obesity (BBC news)
« Reply #13 on: 21 Jun 2021 12:28PM »
I'm sorry you're finding people not happy about your weight loss when you are.

It's difficult to say about these things, isn't it?
(I'm an obsessive problem-solver, so feel free to ignore any suggestions or solutions I offer, even if they sound terribly insistent.)