Author Topic: Dogs banned from beaches?  (Read 719 times)

lankou

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Dogs banned from beaches?
« on: 05 Apr 2021 11:04AM »

Sunshine Meadows

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Re: Dogs banned from beaches?
« Reply #1 on: 05 Apr 2021 11:13AM »
:f_doh: :f_steam: :f_laugh:

KizzyKazaer

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Re: Dogs banned from beaches?
« Reply #2 on: 06 Apr 2021 09:28PM »
A good point well made - human litter is almost as disgusting as dog mess (and even the presence of dog doo-doo is down to inconsiderate oiks who are too lazy to clean up after their hounds :thumbsdown: )

Talking of litter, the amount of discarded face masks lying on pavements, roads, in parks etc is horrific - what is wrong with these sodding people, don't they know what a bin is for? :f_doh:

bulekingfisher

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Re: Dogs banned from beaches?
« Reply #3 on: 16 Apr 2021 07:18PM »
Hello Kizzy Kazaer


May be dog's could train HUMQAN'S

a SIGN READING HUMAN'S NOT ALLOWD ON THE BEACH UNLESS ACCOPNID BY A DOG FINE'S WILL  BE ISSUED  + ENFORCED BY A DOBERMAN

KizzyKazaer

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Re: Dogs banned from beaches?
« Reply #4 on: 16 Apr 2021 09:18PM »
:f_laugh: :thumbsup:

oldtone27

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Re: Dogs banned from beaches?
« Reply #5 on: 17 Apr 2021 11:23AM »
The main problem I see with that idea is that dogs are not very good at clearing up after themselves. At least cats tend to bury their mess, although usually in freshly worked flower beds.

Can't win.  :f_whistle:

Sunny Clouds

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Re: Dogs banned from beaches?
« Reply #6 on: 17 Apr 2021 02:20PM »
I have read that in previous inter-lockdown gatherings, particularly on beaches but also in parks and parts of the countryside used for things like picnics and camping, there has been an increase in human excreta.

I don't justify it, but I can see the logic of why it happens in contexts where public loos have been closed because of the pandemic.  Where I am, in a built up area, we were already having a few problems pre-pandemic with excreta and urination in unwanted places, particularly from homeless people, although we also had what I'll call unofficial toilets in places like a corner of the churchyard, a garden of a long-empty building etc.

That began to become a problem after two things happened - firstly our council put the onus on businesses to provide toilets, e.g. shopping centres, pubs, supermarkets etc., and secondly after it closed most of the remaining public toilets because of drug users leaving dangerous items there, e.g. discarded needles.

Some businesses can understandably not want to admit someone who's not a customer just to use the loo.  On the other hand, some other establishments such as places of worship and community centres may be more generous.  But that's without pandemic restrictions and meanwhile people need, at the very least, somewhere to urinate, and most people will need to empty their bowels around once a day.

As for litter, again I don't excuse it, but what I do notice is news articles where journalists fume over mountains of rubbish in a park, say, without mentioning that the rubbish is in a pile, probably round a bin.  No, the people didn't put the rubbish in a bin, but they did try to put it in the right place.  But hey, why praise people for trying and encourage them to go a step further and take the rubbish home, when you can give them grief?

I got annoyed a couple of years back with some youngsters who dumped food and drink rubbish in my recycling bin, but to give them their due, they were from out of town and looked genuinely taken aback at realising that there were recycling bins with ordinary bins.  They also seemed baffled when I said that where I am, it's quite normal to store your wheely bin up by the kitchen window, so that icky leftovers that stick to the bin and attract flies don't go down well here.  With hindsight, I wish I'd found a way of saying thank you for at least trying but please try better next time.  

After all, nearly getting it right is better than simply dumping it.  I wonder sometimes whether people who do that do it at home as well.  Just dump the rubbish and let another family member clear it up?  Or live in a tip?
(I'm an obsessive problem-solver, so feel free to ignore any suggestions or solutions I offer, even if they sound terribly insistent.)

oldtone27

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Re: Dogs banned from beaches?
« Reply #7 on: 17 Apr 2021 03:05PM »
Last summer Bournemouth had an excrement problem due to lack of open toilets.

This year they plan to provide additional temporary toilets. If these are of the 'Porta-Loo' type then they are probably safer COVID wise than normal toilet blocks as they are individual. No problem with social distancing inside.

Not sure this is going to be helped by the associated plan to have pop-up pubs, although it is proposed that these will be drinks with meals only.

The idea is to encourage visitors to disperse more that three inches along the beach. People seem very reluctant to walk out of sight of their cars. I appreciate this may be a problem for disabled and infirm folk so maybe a beach buggy service would be useful.


Given the number of visitors on good day I think it is very difficult to provide sufficient litter bins without those become a barrier to beach access. Best solution may be to provide none and insist rubbish is taken home.

Sunny Clouds

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Re: Dogs banned from beaches?
« Reply #8 on: 17 Apr 2021 05:14PM »
The problem with providing no bins is that some people just won't take their rubbish home. Apart from anything else, if that rubbish includes stuff like an opened drinks can and a takeaway box/wrapper with drippy sauce, then they won't take it unless they have a drip-proof bag to put it in.

Where I live, there are lots of volunteer litter pickers, but we don't have a beach, just roads and parks.  I don't suppose anywhere will do it, but I'm musing on whether inviting visitors to litter pick might be worth a try.  No, seriously, some people go somewhere then get bored. Also, imagine you're a restless teenager stuck with your parents (or vice-versa!) - litter picking would be a brilliant excuse to get away from them for an our or two.

Litter will continue to be an issue long after the pandemic.  Maybe problems now will prompt new ideas for dealing with it.
(I'm an obsessive problem-solver, so feel free to ignore any suggestions or solutions I offer, even if they sound terribly insistent.)

Fiz

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Re: Dogs banned from beaches?
« Reply #9 on: 17 Apr 2021 06:35PM »
I'm not far from Bournemouth but I have only been there a few times. The beach is always packed but I have no idea where all the people park because parking is a nightmare there. I suspect the locals know the place better than me! It's a great beach and beautiful park with tame squirrels and rabbits.

Sunny Clouds

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Re: Dogs banned from beaches?
« Reply #10 on: 17 Apr 2021 11:31PM »
What I find bemusing, as a townie, is when my fellow townies head for a beach or holiday location and sit surrounded by others, and I think "But if you want to be surrounded by crowds, you could have stayed put and gone to a communal area such as a park or a town square, and you wouldn't have had all that stressful travel to get there and find somewhere to park etc."

But there's something symbolic about going somewhere that's conceptualised as a holiday location, isn't there?
(I'm an obsessive problem-solver, so feel free to ignore any suggestions or solutions I offer, even if they sound terribly insistent.)

ditchdwellers

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Re: Dogs banned from beaches?
« Reply #11 on: 19 Apr 2021 11:21AM »
I used to live a few miles from West Wittering beach in West Sussex and every summer the traffic queues to the beach would be tailed back about seven miles causing gridlock on the A27. It was an absolute nightmare for the us locals who just needed to go about their business. Plus emergency vehicles had terrible problems getting access. 

Most visitors came from London or further afield, and I really couldn't see the appeal in driving for a couple of hours and then sitting in a boiling hot car with tired kids for a further few hours in a queue, to reach an over crowded beach. Only to repeat the process on the way home! 
Sunny bank holiday weekends were the worst, and we used to hunker down with the neighbours and have a big communal barbecue and party to ease the chaos. 

During the pandemic the estate that owns and manages the West Wittering beach and car park introduced an online prebooking system so you couldn't just turn up. Apparently that made a massive difference to the traffic issues and overcrowding problems. The local parish councils, district council, police etc had been on at them for years to do something to control the numbers of visitors, and as soon as they were threatened with closure due to Covid, they miraculously found a solution. Oh cynical me!

I've now moved to another seaside town, still in West Sussex, and I'm now within staggering distance of the beach. However, it's not a particularly popular beach and we don't have traffic or parking issues.

Fiz

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Re: Dogs banned from beaches?
« Reply #12 on: 25 Apr 2021 11:28AM »
My daughter loves West Wittering beach. It's a place that I would love to visit one day. One of Tizzie's puppies (now age 9) walks there daily so I have seen photos of the beach. Is the beach you live near also a sandy beach?

ditchdwellers

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Re: Dogs banned from beaches?
« Reply #13 on: 26 Apr 2021 09:31PM »
It's your typical south coast beach with the upper shoreline of pebbles that are impossible to walk on, and sand at low tide. 
Even the dog refuses to walk on the pebbles (poor poppet!) and prefers the park opposite  :f_laugh:

oldtone27

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Re: Dogs banned from beaches?
« Reply #14 on: 27 Apr 2021 09:01AM »
The beaches around my way are all sand. Even so soft dry sand can still be hard work to walk on. Also after the winter a lot of it ends up on the promenades. :62_62:

If you want pebbles try the 18 mile long Chesil Bank which apparently contain 18 billion pebbles.