Author Topic: Covid jab  (Read 3369 times)

Sunny Clouds

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Re: Covid jab
« Reply #45 on: 27 Sep 2021 01:34PM »
I haven't had my booster.  I haven't read any horror stories about them yet, so do try not to get any melodramatic side-effects before I have mine!

 :xfingers: :f_hug:

(I'm an obsessive problem-solver, so feel free to ignore any suggestions or solutions I offer, even if they sound terribly insistent.)

Fiz

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Re: Covid jab
« Reply #46 on: 27 Sep 2021 01:51PM »
There's a few that have had boosters in the adrenal insufficiency group who are immunocompromised and none have had any side effects. Hope all goes smoothly for you DD. I'm confident about the Pfizer, it doesn't introduce the virus to our bodies so side effects are rare.

Fiz

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Re: Covid jab
« Reply #47 on: 02 Oct 2021 05:06PM »
There's contraversy on social media. I hadn't realised until the last few days that the government have requested the 500,000 who are immunosuppressant to have a third primary Covid vaccine which should be 8 weeks after their second vaccine. This is because they have discovered people who are immunosuppressant due to transplant or chemo etc aren't very protected by two vaccines like most people. However the government have also said that people over 50 and the CEV should have a booster vaccine 6 months after their second vaccine as it's been found that protection from the vaccine reduces over time. People are being called for their boosters before the immunosuppressed are receiving their 3rd primary vaccine causing a lot of upset amongst that immunosuppressed group. It's all a bit of a mess really! I'd go so far as to say that the immunosuppressed must be about six months after their second vaccine now so due a booster anyway so causing this cufuffle when it's going to mean little difference timing wise is bizarre. If a 3rd primary vaccine was needed 8 weeks after their 2nd then it should have happened 4 months ago not now. Now the immunosuppressed are upset with the CEV who are being called before them! What a mess!

Sunny Clouds

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Re: Covid jab
« Reply #48 on: 02 Oct 2021 06:49PM »
I wish I was surprised by this, but I'm not.  Our current government's approach isn't one of competence.  I wish I thought it was just about muddying the waters whilst they get on with their political careers, financial futures and 'chumocracy', but I don't, I think a lot of it is callous incompetence.
(I'm an obsessive problem-solver, so feel free to ignore any suggestions or solutions I offer, even if they sound terribly insistent.)

ditchdwellers

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Re: Covid jab
« Reply #49 on: 03 Oct 2021 02:59PM »
I had my third booster on Thursday evening, four months after my last jab.
My first two were AZ. The first shot I had an extremely adverse reaction to, with the second giving very few effects. This third booster was Pfizer and I have been absolutely knocked for six.


The redness and swelling on my arm spreads from my elbow to my shoulder around the jab site. Today is the the first day I have emerged from the gloom of the bedroom, as my headaches were so bad I couldn't tolerate light. Apart from the the necessary shuffling down the hall to the bathroom I should clarify. My pain levels have been through the roof so I had to resort to the Oramorph which I really don't like doing but it didn't leave me any option.


I still can't really eat anything yet. I've eaten a few rich tea biscuits and don't feel like I can keep anything else down.


I hope this doesn't put anyone off getting their booster jabs  :f_laugh:
I'm just feeling sorry for myself at the moment. And to be honest it was a bit ill timed, as it coincides with the end of this latest series of cluster headaches.


I know I'm over the worst of the side effects and tomorrow will be much better than today!

ditchdwellers

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Re: Covid jab
« Reply #50 on: 03 Oct 2021 03:04PM »
I should add that I'm both immunosuppressed and CEV so I have no idea why I was called now for my booster. The nurse did say I would need another one before too long though. Whoopee.....

Sunny Clouds

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Re: Covid jab
« Reply #51 on: 03 Oct 2021 03:13PM »
I'm assuming (?) that the logic is that if you're that poorly after a jab/booster, you'd be dead or very badly ill after the virus, so it's the lesser of two evils, but even so, it's a horrid situation to be in.

 :big_hugs:
(I'm an obsessive problem-solver, so feel free to ignore any suggestions or solutions I offer, even if they sound terribly insistent.)

On the edge

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Re: Covid jab
« Reply #52 on: 04 Oct 2021 10:49AM »
I'm due my 3rd on Wednesday. I had no reactions to the other two (Pfizer), and don't have currently any major health issue. My only query is they want to offer me the flu jab at the same time.  I said no to that.  I 'may' get it later IF they can convince me it is effective, as we had no exposure to last season's strain is it effective for this one?

ditchdwellers

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Re: Covid jab
« Reply #53 on: 04 Oct 2021 01:41PM »
Interesting question, that one. My husband had his flu jab last month and that's not something I'd even thought about.

Fiz

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Re: Covid jab
« Reply #54 on: 04 Oct 2021 06:19PM »
Was that a 3rd primary or the booster that you had DD? Sorry that you've had such a strong reaction, that's more unusual with the Pfizer. The Pfizer appears more effective against the variants so it's good in a way that you've had the Pfizer rather than the A-Z maybe.


As for the flu jabs, they run on a 3 year cycle so this year's vaccine protects against a different set of flu strains than last year's vaccine. If there is a problem at all it will be in 4 years time when we'll be 5 years away from having received protection from a third of the strains of flu we can currently protect ourselves from and won't have the immunity we would never normall be without for longer than 3 years. Personally I'm not hugely worried about that. Unfortunately the people who might show any vulnerability to that will be elderly residents in residential and nursing homes mostly as they are the highest risk groups to flu.

ditchdwellers

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Re: Covid jab
« Reply #55 on: 05 Oct 2021 02:44PM »
Hi Fiz,
Sorry but I'm a little confused about whether this was a third primary shot or a booster. All I know is that I was sent the text to make the appointment so went!
I spoke to a GP at my surgery yesterday as I wanted to query the severity of the situation and spoke to a GP who interestingly also sits on the local CCG Advisory committee for Covid vaccinations. He questioned me in detail about my jab reaction. Fortunately I already take daily prescription antihistamines and the GP thinks that things could have been very different for me if I hadn't been. He is recording my side effects as a likely allergic reaction and said if there is a further vaccinations offered down the line then I must discuss it with a doctor beforehand, but he clearly said I should probably not have one. I'm quite happy to do that as I have been so unwell.

On the edge

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Re: Covid jab
« Reply #56 on: 06 Oct 2021 11:30AM »
Mine is a 3rd booster jab, as I understand it Covid jabs lose effectiveness after 6 months, I had 2 for this year but the 3rd is being brought in early because of dual fears about the flu infections this year.  My only concern issues having covid and the flu at the same time.  One in each arm.  I just wonder how many jabs the body can take? and they want shingles jabs as well so we are talking 6 jabs a year currently. 


My partner has B12 as well.... I don't know if the original Pfizer jab was even designed to counter the delta variant as when it came out it was to address the Kent one, since then 4 different variants have emerged, some from S Africa and S America.  NOT Helped by Boris saying come one, come all!

Sunny Clouds

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Re: Covid jab
« Reply #57 on: 06 Oct 2021 12:31PM »
I'm thinking of the multiple jab thing.  Obviously there were all the scare stories about MMR that have left understandable concerns, but on the other hand I recall as a child having more than one vaccination together, I just don't remember which.

That being said, I fully accept that it's an issue that we might all ponder, when you look at what our bodies do or don't cope with and for me a key moment was a few years back reading a bit of research tht showed that most of the bus rails sampled on our local buses (in an urban area) had faecal matter with germs in it on them. 

As someone with weird all/nothing 'germ' panics that I have to constantly damp down, I got very worried when I read that.  But the more I thought of it, the more I went back to basics on it and overall quantity that in terms of the pandemic is being referred to as 'viral load'.  We wash hands and wear masks and avoid touching faces not with an expectation (if we're realistic) that we'll get rid of all traces of sars-cov-2, but that we'll reduce it to a level at which our bodies can get rid of it unharmed.

That then takes us back to ordinary health precautions against viruses, bacteria & fungi.  We don't mostly get rid of them all, we reduce to a level our bodies can fight them.  Indeed, that's what traditional vaccines do.

Ironically, our efforts to reduce our contact with germs has led to some clinical researchers to draw a connection between overly sterile babyhood and childhood leukemia, and they've developed what they nicknamed a 'gloop' (they'll probably give it a fancy name if it becomes widely used) that consists of a mix of bacteria to give to babies, to give their immune system a kick start so it functions properly.

On the other hand, research has also shown all sorts of connections between things like gut microbiota and obesity, and is now even showing links between things like a range of bacteria and viruses and some sorts of dementia, so the notion that we need to come into contact with some germs to be healthy isn't an argument that we shouldn't try to avoid too much contact, or that we shouldn't be warier with germs our bodies find harder to handle.

So it's actually perfectly natural for us all to have concerns about how much our bodies can cope with in terms of our immune systems, because we live in a world where we're surrounded with germs and other things our immune systems might react to as if they were germs (e.g. pollen, various foods etc.) and getting the balance between not enough and too much is difficult.

That being so, I won't scorn people's concerns about how many vaccines to have at once; but on the other hand, I try personally to weigh it against a few other things, including how much our bodies cope with all at once anyway in terms of types of germs at once as opposed to quantity of a single type of germ at once, and what's realistic in terms of an underfunded and short-staffed NHS giving out vaccines.

I may be wrong, but the way I see it is this.  Every time you split apart your flu and covid booster jabs, that's two appointments not one.  That then delays either your other jab as you go to the back of the queue, or delays someone else's jab.

Even if it wasn't my other jab that was delayed and even if I didn't care about that other person whose jab was delayed, I have a vested interest in as many people as possible getting their jabs and boosters, because I reckon personally that the risk to my health of having flu and covid jabs together is less than the risk to my health of sitting next to someone on a bus that is still waiting for their first or second jabs whilst those of us onto boosters get them.

On the politics of it, personally I feel that if someone doesn't want both boosters together, they should be the one that goes to the back of the queue after the first one behind others that are still waiting.  I think that that would be a fair compromise.

I feel that way about a Christmas event I'm thinking of booking a place on.  Some performances are specifically socially distanced + immunity passport only.  I've applied for my NHS letter and I'll book for one of those performances.  A nice compromise between those of us that want to be more wary and those that don't. 
(I'm an obsessive problem-solver, so feel free to ignore any suggestions or solutions I offer, even if they sound terribly insistent.)

Fiz

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Re: Covid jab
« Reply #58 on: 06 Oct 2021 06:33PM »
Technically Ote this is the first booster vaccine being given at the moment as the original vaccines were a course of two injections so they weren't boosters. So this is the first booster for the vulnerable and older people only at the moment.


The WHO has stated that evidence says that having both the flu and Covid vaccines at the same time is safe and effective.


However PHE recommends preferably having a 7 day gap between them not for safety or effectiveness reasons, but so that any reaction can be traced back to a specific vaccine. The Pfizer vaccines are not live neither is the flu vaccine for 18-64 year olds so our bodies won't be battling anything with these vaccines.


The Asda-Vinegar and the flu vaccines for children and the flu vaccine for adults 64+ do have mild live elements to them so personally I wouldn't want two vaccines with live elements to them however mild they are. But I am under 65 so my flu vaccine won't be live and as I understand it the boosters are Pfizer's so I would be happy to have them the same day if offered the Pfizer when I go for my flu. But if I had a choice I would follow the PHE guidance of a 7 day gap.


Don't you just love that the WHO and PHE have different advice!

Sunny Clouds

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Re: Covid jab
« Reply #59 on: 06 Oct 2021 06:59PM »
Quote
Don't you just love that the WHO and PHE have different advice!

I don't like it.  I want everything to do with the human body to be simple and straightforward and absolutely certain.

Oh dear.
(I'm an obsessive problem-solver, so feel free to ignore any suggestions or solutions I offer, even if they sound terribly insistent.)