Author Topic: D.W.P-Drive to get more disabled people into jobs through AtoW  (Read 1961 times)

AccessOfficer

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19 November 2012
The changes announced today mean:
 1. Businesses with up to 49 employees will no longer pay a contribution towards the extra costs faced by disabled people in work, saving them up to £2,300 per employee who uses the fund;
 2. Disabled jobseekers who want to set up their own business through the New Enterprise Allowance will now be eligible for Access to Work funding from day one of receiving Job Seekers Allowance; and
 3. Access to Work advisers will be given more flexibility in deciding which equipment is funded through the scheme, offering more choice to disabled people in work.

Minister for Disabled People, Esther McVey said:
 
"Work is more than a job – it’s one of the best ways to increase independence, life fulfilment, social engagement and is central to someone’s identity.  And although the disability employment rate has increased over recent years, there is still more we need to do to close the gap with non-disabled people.
 
“That is why we are now making these changes to Access to Work, to widen the scope of those who can benefit from this support, because disabled people aspire to the same jobs as everyone else.
 
"By opening up the Access to Work programme it will give disabled people more opportunities to have the same choice of jobs as everyone else, in every sector from hairdressing to engineering, and at every level."

http://www.dwp.gov.uk/newsroom/press-releases/2012/nov-2012/dwp122-12.shtml

Hmmm. Another headline grabber or what?

Best wishes
AO

AccessOfficer

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Sorry Devine63,
I see you have already posted this news on the News ans Current Affairs board.
My apologies
AO

KizzyKazaer

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This is the other thread:  http://ouchtoo.org/index.php?topic=4540.0 - but they're not quite the same;  Deb's post is more about the nuts and bolts of the practical changes to AtoW that are in favour of the disabled person who is wanting - and able - to work.   This post includes a 'value judgement' quote from the Minister for Disabled People which has me baring my teeth somewhat, particularly the bit I've put in bold:

"Work is more than a job – it’s one of the best ways to increase independence, life fulfilment, social engagement and is central to someone’s identity.

I've been arguing (mostly with myself) for years that a person shouldn't be mainly defined by what they 'do for a living'.  Otherwise, when the job is taken away, what's left - an empty shell of a human being with nothing to offer and no reason to exist?  We are so much more than that.  'Central to someone's identity', my arse.


AccessOfficer

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Well said Kizzy, my feelings entirely
AO

xSparksx

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I've been arguing (mostly with myself) for years that a person shouldn't be mainly defined by what they 'do for a living'.  Otherwise, when the job is taken away, what's left - an empty shell of a human being with nothing to offer and no reason to exist?  We are so much more than that.  'Central to someone's identity', my arse.

That's exactly what's left, Kizzy. My grandfather (90 now) is a prime example of that! He still defines himself solely by the work he did, and now he literally has nothing left. It's a sad, miserable existence. He has no quality of life because he never bothered to find new interests post-retirement (or during his working life, indeed).

KizzyKazaer

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Sparks, I've heard of people like that too - who don't even survive as long as your grandfather.  People who fall into deep depression once they have retired because work was everything to them and now they have lost their reason for being.  People whose health and enthusiasm for life has declined and people who have even died shortly after retirement, almost like they willed themselves to go - because they became the job, so without that, they felt there was no point in living.  I think it's terribly sad and wasteful, and the 'work is the be-all and end-all' attitude is not something that should be encouraged by a Government minister in this way  >steam<


(edited for formatting)
« Last Edit: 20 Nov 2012 01:28PM by KizzyKazaer »

xSparksx

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Yes, Kizzy, that's exactly my grandfather. Deeply depressed (refuses to even discuss the idea of antidepressants) and his health has declined, he's mostly blind and mostly deaf, and has no conception of how hard my grandmother works to keep him going! In his case (and I'm afraid I will add 'unfortunately' to this) he seems pretty determined to stay alive, which I suspect in his case is a deep fear of what comes after death, since he was raised fairly in basically a Christian cult!

It is terribly sad and wasteful indeed. I've never been well enough to work (I started getting ill with ME at around aged 12, and limped through school) and I hope even if/when I am well enough to work that I won't define myself by that. My ideal is to write children's novels, and I'm hoping when I recover from my current slump that I'll be able to start (I have the idea, it's all planned out, I'm just not well enough right now). But I'm me first, and whatever I do to earn a living will be second. Maybe it's /because/ I haven't worked that I don't define myself that way? I've had to define myself by other things!

oldtone27

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I too know people, men in particular, who find themselves lost once they stop working. I think this may be particularly true of older men who lived mostly through the period of fairly full employment. There was a culture and camaraderie of work and was lost with the job.

Before I retired I considered what I would do. I had a number of home projects and when I had done those I would find some voluntary work.  As it turned out the home projects never got started because I found an interesting and fulfilling voluntary post almost immediately.

I have been very fortunate because I started work in a time of full employment and have never been out of work. I have also worked in jobs where I had to make decisions. This might be contentious, but I wonder if many men may have sort of wandered into a job, always been subject to someone else instruction, and never had to really plan their own lives so are not equipped for retirement.

So whilst I agree people should not be defined by their job it certainly can contribute significantly to their perceived worth.

bubble

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Kizzy.......... my opinion which of course may be wrong.............. only the power crazed think that work is be all end all.

The rest of us see our identity  and sense of self worth in other areas of life. Caring and compassion, a kind word to others make the world go around and life worthwhile. 

People that think only work gives them their identity, come a cropper when work is taken away or retirement and go into a deep depression.


devine63

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Hi

Sociologists have observed for a long term that (broadly speaking we all know it is a generalisation) men often define themselves by their work - and this is believed to be one of the reasons why men tend to react more strongly to unemployment than women do.
On the other hand: women tend to define themselves by their family relationships first and their work comes further down the list, so they are more resilient about loss of employment but may be more affected by loss/change of relationships (break ups, deaths, children leaving home, etc.).

regards, Deb

KizzyKazaer

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With the way our society is structured (and also those differences between the mindsets of men and women that will, I suspect, always be with us no matter what equality laws are introduced) that all makes perfect sense, Deb...

The rest of us see our identity  and sense of self worth in other areas of life. Caring and compassion, a kind word to others make the world go around and life worthwhile.

 >thumbsup< >thumbsup<  There are several ways to contribute to one's community (and the wider world) - paid work is just one of them!

devine63

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Absolutely right, Kizzy!
regards, deb

JLRRAC

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"only the power crazed think that work is be all end all."

To my way of thinking those rich and power crazed folk who boast of how they want to work constantly all the hours that God sends are kidding no one. They work to keep up with their mates in the rich/wealth league, if one of their number has 3 luxury cars and buys another before it's parked their mates partner is ordering their mate to get a more expensive car to add to their garage.

If one rich and powerful punter has a 15 bedroom hoose no doubt one of their mates will look to find a 16 bedroom hoose or buy a 15 bedroom hoose cheaper and then boast of how they took the micky oot the punter selling the hoose, for instance "Aye the hoose was worth easy 1.5 million ah got it for 950k, daft bugger, he'd better find another agent for selling his next hoose". Peoples lives outside the lives of the rich and powerful are more or less meaningful.

The R&P care more about the colour of their lawn's grass than the people who work in their employment earning the R&P their wealth. 

seegee

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I would like to ask those who measure their worth in money or the "status" of their job how they would value themselves if all their debts were called in tomorrow (a lot of "rich" people have a number of investments, mortgaged properties, etc) and they lost not only their current home but also their employment (because employers go bust too, self-employed people aren't exempt). 
Those who have no other measures of worth probably deserve a measure of pity for the education they have received.