Author Topic: I dispair  (Read 234 times)

JLR2

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I dispair
« on: 03 Jan 2021 06:44PM »
Watching the BBC news earlier there and they made mention of the sad passing of Gerry Marsden, unfortunately the lass presenting the news just could not keep her mouth shut and yapped throughout the story, I found myself screaming at the tv screen calling for her to shut her mouth. Instead of letting viewers hear Marsden's singing of "You'll Never Walk Alone"  she yapped on and on telling viewers of some song that has been an anthem of Liverpool fans ever since Gerry and the Pacemakers released the song.

Mind you the stupid presenter did manage to shut her mouth long enough to allow viewers to hear the screaming of the group's fans.

And it is not just this news presenter at the BBC who has not the sense to let viewers hear for themselves such as Marsden singing You'll Never Walk Alone there was recently the clown who couldn't haud his tongue when the news story involved the RAF's Mosquitoes and instead talked over the Mosquitoes sound telling us all what a wonderful sound it was to hear, if only he had shut his mouth we might have been able to hear it for ourselves.
« Last Edit: 03 Jan 2021 06:46PM by JLR2 »

oldtone27

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Re: I dispair
« Reply #1 on: 04 Jan 2021 08:54AM »
I agree, I think there is a tendency for newsreaders to think their commentary is more important than the story.

JLR2

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Re: I dispair
« Reply #2 on: 04 Jan 2021 10:41AM »
Oldtone, I've been noticing over recent weeks especially when such as the newspaper reviews are being shown on the BBC's news channel the news reader/presenter has a tendency to virtually read the whole story of a front page article before moving onto the next newspaper's headlines. This yapping by the presenters is also to be seen when asking questions of guests, the presenter tends to go on and on rather than asking a short direct question. I feel shorter questions leave guests less room to avoid answering the question asked, particularly useful when the guest is a politician.

A question I have recently found myself asking is what is the difference between an answer and a reply?

To my thinking a reply is no more than a response to the question whereas an answer is directly related to the question asked. For example, the question being asked is what is 2 + 2?  a reply could be give that it is an arithmetic question however an answer would be 4. Might it be an idea for the Speaker of the House of Commons (presently Hoyle) at the next PMQ's to call on the PM to provide an answer to the question asked rather than a reply?

oldtone27

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Re: I dispair
« Reply #3 on: 04 Jan 2021 10:52AM »
I can't comment on the newspaper reviews as I don't tend to watch them, however I do agree about the tendency towards long and tortuous questions.

They often seem to be more a statement by the interviewer than a question. I find  Andrew Marr particularly guilty of that. He then often interrupts the reply,

I appreciate politicians often waffle and avoid a direct answers but they should at least be given a chance to speak more that a couple of words.

JLR2

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Re: I dispair
« Reply #4 on: 04 Jan 2021 11:06AM »
"I appreciate politicians often waffle and avoid a direct answers but they should at least be given a chance to speak more that a couple of words."

They are Oldtone, unless of course they are SNP MPs or other opposition party members. Between them Marr and the presenters on the Scottish Sunday political programs are the worst when it comes to interruptions. Were it not for the fact that the BBC would sack, quicker than Trump a Secretary of State in the US, any presenter who dared cut or mute Johnson's mic during an interview or called for him to either shut up or answer the question they had asked him we might actually begin to get some questions answered.

My dream, and it is I know a dream, is to watch as an interviewer tell the likes of Johnson, "Well we are leaving this interview as there is no point in listening to you're waffling on pointlessly and refusing to answer directly the questions we are asking on behalf of our viewers".