Author Topic: Lockdown and mental health  (Read 516 times)

JLR2

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Lockdown and mental health
« on: 27 Nov 2020 10:13PM »
I've been wondering about the amount we hear about folks concern regarding lockdown and how it is affecting folks mental health, like has it not crossed the minds of those in government (DWP included)  that for many on disability benefits lockdowns aren't much different to the life that many of us are living even without there being a virus like Covid19?   My day to day life can see me at times like the crofter working his/her croft not seeing anyone else for days on end beyond the telly, watching DVDs repeatedly or listening to music there is not much else I have to do all day. A visit to the doctor or shopping is the nearest I get to meeting anyone else, I do have my daily chat with my friend in Berlin on the phone but beyond that there is nothing and it is this that makes having Ouch Too so valuable to me, sure we might never meet but Ouch Too is like family to me. Talking of family it is only in sporadic calls that I hear from my family in Glasgow and now with the pandemic I am hesitant to be calling them as with my Dad's deteriorating health, early onset of dementia, I don't want to be bothering my sister who is looking after both him and her partner who is himself suffering from serious health problems she is doing all this whilst trying to run her business at the same time.

I'm not meaning my point in starting this posting to be about me and my problems but more about how the mental health of people with serious disabilities have, I feel been ignored for years by various governments, it is my wonder if should the announced Covid19 vaccines prove to be worth the praise we've been hearing about them and the country regains a sense of normality about it will the government remember the lessons of how isolation and the feelings of isolation can impact on many who due to their disabilities are unable to work and face the results of government rhetoric in such as their shirker/scrounger campaigns?

oldtone27

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Re: Lockdown and mental health
« Reply #1 on: 28 Nov 2020 11:39AM »
JLR poses the question
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...if should the announced Covid19 vaccines prove to be worth the praise we've been hearing about them and the country regains a sense of normality about it will the government remember the lessons of how isolation and the feelings of isolation can impact on many who due to their disabilities are unable to work...

I fear the answer is no.

Sunshine Meadows

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Re: Lockdown and mental health
« Reply #2 on: 29 Nov 2020 11:53AM »
Good question.
For me symptoms and limitations place on me by my disability and illnesses are what keep me isolated. That said having enough money for clothes and the car etc does mean that when I do go out I feel on a par with other people. When I was young I had next to nothing, no wheelchair, jeans with holes in, one pair of shoes a year, a cold home and black and white tv etc. I just hid myself away all the time, felt like a nothing and a nobody for years, decades even. During the lockdown people who have had to turn to the Universal Credit are getting more than a taste of what it is like to feel poverty in action. I am hoping that there will be a new attitude towards people on welfare benefits that is less blaming and shaming. An attitude that carries across to how sick and disabled people are assumed to be this or that.




JLR2

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Re: Lockdown and mental health
« Reply #3 on: 29 Nov 2020 03:06PM »
"I am hoping that there will be a new attitude towards people on welfare benefits that is less blaming and shaming."

Sadly I think all that they might have learnt will  be forgotten in the link of an eye, no doubt encouraged to be forgotten if the likes of the Mail or more likely the Express in cahoots with the BBC run another season of anti-benefit claimant programs or stories.

KizzyKazaer

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Re: Lockdown and mental health
« Reply #4 on: 30 Nov 2020 09:37PM »
Quote
I've been wondering about the amount we hear about folks concern regarding lockdown and how it is affecting folks mental health, like has it not crossed the minds of those in government (DWP included)  that for many on disability benefits lockdowns aren't much different to the life that many of us are living even without there being a virus like Covid19?

Well, my life didn't really change much during the lockdown that started in March - and nor did the state of my mental health, come to that, but then I don't do meeting up with people anyway (apart from Dad as we've 'bubbled up' together)  My feelings did go out to those whose well-being was affected severely by the lack of socialising opportunities, though.  It's a blessing to be happy with one's own company....

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I am hoping that there will be a new attitude towards people on welfare benefits that is less blaming and shaming. An attitude that carries across to how sick and disabled people are assumed to be this or that.

I think that depends on how entrenched the old attitudes are.  The hope seems to be that the Covid crisis has made for a kinder society across the board, eg people helping neighbours they wouldn't in normal times have taken much notice of.   No doubt we shall see the truth, or otherwise, of that in time...

Frances

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Re: Lockdown and mental health
« Reply #5 on: 02 Dec 2020 07:51PM »
Ryan and I are lucky we at least have each other. But we see no one Else Except Postie and Tesco delvery, Even large Son lives up North and doesn't bother to phone much. My brother is about 60 miles away we phone every week or so. Neighbours never bother with us , Except for one who 80 plus and not very with it. She is lucky she has 5 sons one just a couple of roads away. We do have an adorable little Pup our old dog died a couple of days before Xmas. This one was very badly treated but from being scared of her own tail. She has turned into a Darling !

JLR2

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Re: Lockdown and mental health
« Reply #6 on: 03 Dec 2020 04:35AM »
Were it not for my having my calls with my friend in Berlin and the friends I have here on Ouch Too things would feel much different for me is so many ways.

You wee pup sounds lovely Frances, what's his/her name?   The nearest I have to a pet is the blackbirds who greet me when I arrive home or go to leave the house as they'll got into the habit of visiting me as they know I provide raisins for them, something that started a few years back when there was a blackbird nesting in the hedge by my front window and had 5 little ones to feed.

Once again I've ended up out my kip in the early hours because of the ankle, I'll have to check the dressing and maybe reapply it.

JLR2

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Re: Lockdown and mental health
« Reply #7 on: 03 Dec 2020 06:09AM »
There is an aspect of life that's starting to get to me more and more or at least I find myself thinking about at times. This is to do with how wee things can have an impact on how we might be feeling. I've now been living where I am for 23 years and in that time apart from a visit so many years back I cannot even remember when it was that my father and a few others visited me here there has been fewer than 10 people ever seen the inside of my home as actual visitors rather than workmen doing repairs such as a plumber or the like. Robin McKay, Big Alec and Charlie Will and that's about it it seems that if you want to meet anyone up here you have to be right into the pub goer way of life as outside of seeing folk in the pub you simply don't see them, sure you'll get the hi there or the slight wave of acknowledgement from across the street as you pass when out shopping but that's about it.

One area of life this is really felt is in I'm guessing the need, or maybe it's just my need, to hear opinion(s) on whatever changes I've made in the house. Take yesterday I was working on converting the framing that used to be a bakery trolley in my local Coop, one of those 14/15 shelf trolleys used to carry rolls and the like out to the shelves in the front store. Half of it is cut down and sits in my back garden with two concrete paving slabs on top of it making an all weather garden table the top half I worked on as I was saying yesterday and now sits on top of my kitchen worktop in a corner with a steel table top on it, I cut off one leg of the frame so it now allows access underneath for storage, things like cutting boards and the orange juicer and a few other kitchen gadgets underneath and my microwave sitting on top.

What I tend to find myself doing is looking to make as much use out of what I have lying around the place, there's things like the little Cd holder that I've put together using scraps of wood that sits over one of my music system's speakers, to dress up the appearance of it I used the cut off legs from an old coffee table placed upside down and all sanded and stained to match up with the nearby furniture I have. I understand it will be hard for you to imagine what I'm talking about but what I'm trying to say is that without having my friend over from Berlin and unlikely to be over for months and the even smaller chance that my family in Glasgow are likely to ever visit me here again I find myself wondering if I'll still be here to have any such visits. I even have had doubts over recent days if my friend in Berlin will ever share a summers evening sitting out in the back garden under the gazebo I had built and sharing the wee two seat garden bench I bought with that idea in mind. I'm a little concerned regarding my friend being over any time soon as when we have been chatting about the recent vaccine news I get the distinct feeling she is being influenced by the news stories about those anti vaccine protesters.

Right now I feel powerless and unable to do anything to allay her fears regarding the safety of the vaccines, I'm no scientist but one thing for sure if and when I find myself being offered one of these vaccines I will not refuse it.

Time for me to be putting me pot of coffee on :o)
« Last Edit: 03 Dec 2020 06:19AM by JLR2 »

Frances

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Re: Lockdown and mental health
« Reply #8 on: 03 Dec 2020 11:48AM »
Coffee I must get off my butt and get one maybe then I will wake up.  I must feed Babe (Little Pup) anyway .  It's so quiet here at the moment, Carer will be here shortly. Costs

KizzyKazaer

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Re: Lockdown and mental health
« Reply #9 on: 03 Dec 2020 09:02PM »
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One area of life this is really felt is in I'm guessing the need, or maybe it's just my need, to hear opinion(s) on whatever changes I've made in the house

Well, here's one - you appear to be a very creative sort who does a lot of recycling :-)

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I'm no scientist but one thing for sure if and when I find myself being offered one of these vaccines I will not refuse it. 

Me neither - sod the anti-vaxxers, I'm glad Facebook will now be removing any of their stupid conspiracy theory posts and hope other social media sites will do likewise...


KizzyKazaer

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Re: Lockdown and mental health
« Reply #10 on: 03 Dec 2020 09:03PM »
PS - Frances, sorry that you lost Dixie last year, it's good to know you have another adorable little dog to help you through the trials and tribulations you've endured of late!

JLR2

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Re: Lockdown and mental health
« Reply #11 on: 03 Dec 2020 10:34PM »
Noo therr's a wee coincidence, the first dogs I ever knew were our family dog, Dixie, and my Gran's dog Glen. Dixie was a pure born rat catcher and given we were living in a very small flat in a tenement in Glasgow's Dennistoun with the shared toilet out on the landing wee Dixie had her work cut out for her. Glen was a rough collie and looked absolutely stunning.

The recycling thing with me is purely down to money, or rather the lack of it. As things stand at the moment because of the Covid19 virus all the charity shops are compelled to remain closed including the main one I liked to visit, Blythswood in Alness. The number of bits and pieces I have found there would surprise you. One such purchase was two what I guess were intended to be bedside cabinets with two drawers. They were made using pinewood and fairly strongly put together. On getting them home I found the 'NEXT' label on the inside of the drawers. I sanded one down the other day and having stained it to match other shelves I had put together to hold some books and DVDs fitted a small cupboard lock with a brass key-hole and a keyhole pull/protector over it. I think it looks OK and it is ideal for holding my Denon mini music system (Denon's UDRM10)  which I had bought years back in Currys Inverness. I added a sub-woofer later and in order to have this wee 2 drawer thing sit over the SW I added from bits of timber left over from the gazebo building a couple of legs of sorts lifting the unit about 8/9 inches off the floor.

Any wood I find I cannot make use of ends up as kindling for the fire :o)  Usually I leave things lying around for long enough before I get another, usually daft, idea of what I might be able to do with it. The back of the wee shelf thing I made to sit over an old Awia speaker came originally from one of those wooden tea trolleys that hade seen its best years. I'm one of those folk who whenever something is beyond its designed purpose I'll sit and take it apart saving any screws and bits I might be able to use at some point. I've even a small brass spindle thing from an old clock I took to pieces and having polished up the brass have it on my coffee table as a little spinning top sort of thing.

All my DIY notions may come over as a bit daft or silly but in some ways I feel it keeps me going in so much as it gives my head like mental exercise. I have never been much good so far as things like engineering or design but when building the shelf unit I put together in my kitchen over the past few days trying to work out how to build it and have is capable to hold the weight of the microwave that now sits on the stainless steel work top I added to the top of it took a fair bit of thought, least for me it was a lot of thought. The worktop was being scrapped and in the skip of my friend Colin who has his metal fabrication business and so I offered to buy it and got it for a few pounds, it was originally part of a kitchen Colin's company put into Skibo Castle near Dornoch and along with it I got hold of a large steel corner unit with enclosed shelving underneath. Were it not for Skibo Castle doing their refurbishment there was no way I could ever have paid the original cost of these units.

One little plan I have for another time is to add a roll down insulated blind over where the door is to the immersion heater tank, I dry things like bedding in the cupboard when the weather is too damp or wet to be putting it outside, and having put a blind up I'll be able to put shelving up on the wall beside the cupboard as I will not have the problem of trying to open the cupboard door, well that's the idea whether I ever get around to it is another story :o)