Author Topic: Healthy Lifestyle Drop-in Centre  (Read 1392 times)

ditchdwellers

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Healthy Lifestyle Drop-in Centre
« on: 17 Jan 2022 09:25AM »
I've been inspired by Sunny's post about biscuits to finally take charge of my ever increasing waistline.
Fiz is right in saying that pain levels are easier when you don't carry excessive amounts of extra weight around like I am at the moment. I took that first step this morning and weighed myself  :f_steam: ..I've put on over a stone since my last weigh in before Christmas. I'm really angry with myself and frustrated that it goes on so easily but is a bugger to get rid of!


So, is anyone up for a supportive general place where we can talk about ideas for recipes, tactics, psychology behind weight management, healthy lifestyles, exercise ideas, cry on each other's shoulders when we're having a bad day, whatever anyone needs it to be.
I'm going to try to start the year with a positive attitude. Small steps and hopefully I will reach my goal. There's no hurry!

Sunny Clouds

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Re: Healthy Lifestyle Drop-in Centre
« Reply #1 on: 17 Jan 2022 03:56PM »
That sounds like a good idea.

I'll kick off with a niggle about how, whilst weight is a very useful measure (which I use) for variation in our bodies, it can be quite misleading.  I don't mean that anyone here misunderstands it, we're too aware, but that often advice, including official advice, is rubbish over it, which makes it harder to work out what's best.

Contrast:-

I am currently approximately (within a couple of pounds or so) the same weight as I was when I was the fittest I ever was in my life when younger, a time in my life when I was swimming, running, working out in the gym, doing martial arts, cycling etc.  At least 3 hours of serious exercise every day and often more.  That weight is in the 'overweight' range on NHS tables.  Then I was fit and muscular, now I'm not.

Well yes, you might say, but I'll bet you were smaller then.  Not quite.  Same trouser size.

Eh?  But surely that extra weight had to be muscle?  Yes, lots was, but I had fat hips.  Not a fat belly, though, and now my belly's got too much fat.  Yes, it's not even clothing size that says enough, it's what sort of fat and where.

And then that brings us to what we're trying to achieve anyway.  If you've got health conditions that make it tough to carry extra weight around (which isn't my issue) then partly there's a difficult balance in terms of how much muscle you want where.

In my case, I'll refer to 'losing weight', but whilst from an outward appearance perspective I'd like to be slimmer, given that I've already got sagging skin with empty fat cells that I wouldn't get rid of without surgery, then unless fashion for my social group becomes tight, skinny jeans to hold it in, I'm not going to look much thinner.  Well, except my face, and droopy skin on face doesn't always look healthy, but then flabby skin tends not to.  (That 'but...' was added on as it popped up in my mind as a reminder to myself.)

And right now?  I've been recognising this last couple of weeks that over the last few years, the periods when I've been fittest have been when I've spent a lot of time doing what I think of as 'pottering round', e.g. sorting, tidying, vacuuming etc.  Again, thinking as I type, time to have another go at some more rearranging of my house to increase how much I move from room to room to do things.  I also need to psych myself up for thorough 'spring cleaning' starting early, stretching the meaning of it as wide as possible.

I'm also thinking how I've some things that need doing that I've put off.  I've a plug needs changing on a cable.  I bought the plug last summer and still haven't done it.   I've some trousers that need slight tailoring.  Again, not massive activity, but getting out my sewing machine and setting it up and using it would involve moving things round.  Ok, that's my task for this week - increase how much I do in terms of little tasks round the house.

Foodwise, as per the chocolate thread that can move here, I think, I'm trying to work out what does or doesn't make me feel good and why.
(I'm an obsessive problem-solver, so feel free to ignore any suggestions or solutions I offer, even if they sound terribly insistent.)

KizzyKazaer

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Re: Healthy Lifestyle Drop-in Centre
« Reply #2 on: 17 Jan 2022 04:32PM »
Great idea for a thread, DD - I'm happy for both this and Sunny's chocolate thread to be in Talk, as food, weight and exercise can have a significant bearing on disability matters, especially on a personal level, so have moved it for you  :thumbsup:

Fiz

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Re: Healthy Lifestyle Drop-in Centre
« Reply #3 on: 17 Jan 2022 04:57PM »
Great thread DD.


I don't do new year's resolutions but my aim for this year is to lose weight for health reasons mostly but also to raise my self-esteem.


I have some Renpho smart scales which tell me everything about my body, not just weight but weight or mass of bones, water, muscle and fat. And metabolic age  :f_doh:  and so there's various figures to look at. They were remarkably cheap! At the moment I am weighing weekly on Saturdays and have lost 4.5lbs this year. I'm bang on a stone so hopefully will drop down a number this Saturday which always feels good.


I'm eating keto, no starchy or complex carbs at all, no refined sugar (except for trace amounts in pure Heavenly chocolate but I am not buying more) and also using the nutracheck app to track my calorie and nutritional intake daily. The nutracheck app suits me as I make meal preps for the freezer in pyrex dishes with plastic lids and I can type in the ingredients in the batch and how many portions it created and it works out the calories per meal so when I get a meal from the freezer to heat and eat I just tap on the name of my meal prep. I can also scan labels on the smartphone so when I bought lunch in a supermarket to have out I just scanned the meal deal and it totted up the calories and told me how many I had left for the day. It sets up the days calories based on your current weight and how many calories you need to keep below in order to lose weight. I've inputted sedentary lifestyle because there wasn't a stagnant lifestyle option.


Any sort of exercise is impossible currently due to pain and fatigue. But if I can keep on track with the eating that's a good start. My aim, no idea whether I will manage it, is to lose a stone from where I am now and then add in some exercise. I've only gone over my calorie limit twice this year.


It'll be great to encourage each other with keeping on track and accountability. No weekly fees here! No scales shaming either!

ally

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Re: Healthy Lifestyle Drop-in Centre
« Reply #4 on: 17 Jan 2022 05:31PM »
I lost five stone last year, and, I have kept it off.   I would like to lose another stone, but, it’s ok if I don’t.   I’m not bragging, as mine was done out of necessity.   I was borderline diabetic, high BP, my cholesterol was rising, and, I had anaemia.  That’s why I decided to lose weight, for health reasons   I can’t join slimming clubs due to being profoundly deaf, so, I did it alone by researching the internet.  If anyone is interested I can post the sites that helped me lose weight. 

Fiz

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Re: Healthy Lifestyle Drop-in Centre
« Reply #5 on: 17 Jan 2022 05:56PM »
Yes please do post them ally. And how to you stay motivated? And how did you resist cravings?


You've done amazingly well.

ally

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Re: Healthy Lifestyle Drop-in Centre
« Reply #6 on: 17 Jan 2022 10:42PM »
I get recipes from slimming eats,  pinch of nom, also, if you ignore the naughty bits, two chubby cubs. I follow the principles of Slimming world.  Fat girl skinny explains it all on her blog.  All vegetables, including potatoes, meat, fruits, are free to eat.  I eat light and free yoghurts.  However, most low fat yoghurts would be fine.  For breakfast you can eat some Cereals as a healthy extra B.  Or two slices of wholemeal bread.  If you choose the bread after the cereal you have to syn it.   


Healthy extra A is a certain amount of cheese and milk.  There’s lots on Pinterest about slimming world.  There’s also myfitnesspal which does calorie counting or SlimIt is another one.  I do a bit of everything.   I didn’t care for weight watchers,  as toting up a points based system is too fiddly for me.  Slimming world can also be joined on line.   However, £5.95 a week I think is too expensive. You could ask your GP if they would give you a referral to slimming world for 12 weeks.   Some surgeries participate in the scheme if their patients are overweight.  It’s worth your while asking about it.

ally

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Re: Healthy Lifestyle Drop-in Centre
« Reply #7 on: 17 Jan 2022 10:47PM »
See below information on slimming world referral by surgeries


https://www.slimmingworld.co.uk/health/swor/how-does-it-work.aspx

Fiz

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Re: Healthy Lifestyle Drop-in Centre
« Reply #8 on: 18 Jan 2022 04:13AM »
Ah I can't follow sw while on steroids as it's not generally successful but I know that of all the subscription services it is the most successful.


What I'm doing currently appears to be helping for now

ditchdwellers

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Re: Healthy Lifestyle Drop-in Centre
« Reply #9 on: 19 Jan 2022 12:28PM »
My aim is to generally feel better, emotionally, physically, and mentally. I'm trying to take a holistic approach to my wellbeing rather than focusing on one particular aspect of it.
Losing some weight would be good for me in many ways so I'm beginning to be more aware of everything I eat and my portion sizes. I started a new med six weeks ago that can cause weight gain so I'm watching out for unusual fluctuations. My diet is also still a little restricted due to recovering from stomach ulcers.


I think the thing that has the most profound effect on my wellbeing is slowly decluttering since moving 18 months ago. It's still an on going process and has taken a long time to see any benefits, but after passing on one car load of treasures to my sister, two car loads to the council recycling centre, and two to the charity shop even my husband commented how cathartic he found it.
To achieve this I have just sorted out one drawer or cupboard at a time so that it didn't become overwhelming. Yesterday I sorted out a deep drawer in the bottom of the desk that was jam packed full of old computer cables and charging leads for long gone phones and printers. Why on earth we still have them is baffling however we are terrible hoarders and are now determined to kick the habit.
Both myself and my husband feel better from having less clutter about the place and it's so much easier to find everything now. The drawers and cupboards have been cleaned thoroughly and reorganised with things like baskets and drawer dividers. There's not too much decluttering left to do now. I think it will probably take me a further four months to complete and then I hope it will be easier to keep on top the clutter from then on.


If anyone has a lot of personal paperwork to dispose of, I discovered that my local district council provided a household confidential waste service. I have to phone and pay for however many sacks I want and they are dropped off. When the sacks are full then I phone the council and they pick them up from the doorstep.


Hoarding has been an issue in our household over the years and finally starting to take control is a real boost.







Sunny Clouds

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Re: Healthy Lifestyle Drop-in Centre
« Reply #10 on: 19 Jan 2022 02:52PM »
I have to resist the temptation to hoard, and I alternate between hoarding and decluttering, but with the throwing out sometimes being absurd.

However, for me personally, I've found what's most soothing (and I don't argue that it would be for anyone else) is to organise as much as possible into boxes, bags, crates etc., the sense being that I'm ready to move, that if and when I next move, it won't be a crisis.  I conceptualise it as like keeping my army kit on standby.

I do it to the extent that I use plastic boxes/crates that have lids, with or without the lids on, as 'drawers' on shelves. 

As I say, I'm not arguing that's the best approach for others.

That being said, elsesite, someone recommended a phrase for keeping one's home tidy that helps me, which is "Put it away not down."  My place isn't as tidy as it could be, but tidier than it would otherwise be, as I look at things and tell myself sternly "Away, not down!"
(I'm an obsessive problem-solver, so feel free to ignore any suggestions or solutions I offer, even if they sound terribly insistent.)

Fiz

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Re: Healthy Lifestyle Drop-in Centre
« Reply #11 on: 20 Jan 2022 09:15AM »
I've had help from the mental health OT rehab team in clearing the clutter in my bedroom. Apart from one cardboard packing case of clothes it is now immaculate and virtually finished. I think what's helped me, along with the practical and emotional support of the OT, was coming so close to dying in March 2020. It really brought home to me how irrelevant material things are and how meaningless. Suddenly if things aren't useful or giving me pleasure, they're no longer important. I have fed the local charity shop so much over the last year as well as landfill. I can see a time when my whole house is uncluttered and tidy.


There's common advice on wardrobe decluttering saying that if you put all the coat hangers facing one direction and when you wear something and replace it, turn that hanger the other way around and after a year anything you haven't worn, give to charity. I'm not sure I advocate that entirely as I have an outfit or two for weddings, not that they currently fit me but I live in hope that they will so I am keeping them. I am currently a size 20 and have kept clothing I like that is size 18, in hope, in zipped bags in a cupboard and have kept jeans which are expensive that are size 16. All size 14, 12 and 10 have gone to charity. Books have gone. Presents that I am given that I feel that I will never use have also gone to charity as soon as I am given them. I have lost count of the car loads that have gone. I love my tidy uncluttered bedroom. My house is getting there. I'd love to say that dealing with the clutter has sorted my mental health problems but in my lows I just feel happy that I am not leaving my hoarding to others to sort out when I am gone and that's not a problem anybody needs. Meanwhile though, I am not missing the clutter.


One bit of advice I read recently with regard to emotional eating is to practice noticing an urge and not responding to it. It suggests starting with an itch. Notice the itch, and choose not to respond to it so not following the urge to scratch it. Working your way up in difficulty you can notice the urge to go and explore cupboards or the fridge to see what there is to eat, and not respond to it. Unless you are hungry or need a meal of course! But it's a theory worth exploring maybe.

ditchdwellers

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Re: Healthy Lifestyle Drop-in Centre
« Reply #12 on: 23 Jan 2022 12:53PM »
I seem to be having a tricky time with some side effects from new meds that are affecting my day to day ability to do things. The meds are prescribed by my neurologist (not licenced in the UK) for the treatment of chronic migraines. Ironically, they seem to be making them worse and are also increasing the number and severity of cluster headaches I'm experiencing.
Increasing headaches can be one of the side effects, as is weight gain and I have found my appetite increase dramatically since starting these meds. I don't know if it's a true effect of the drug or I'm just making excuses for being a greedy cow and constantly getting the munchies!
My next phone appointment with the neurologist is next month so I intend to ask him what to do. I don't want to stop taking the meds suddenly in case I need to titrate off them. The meds come in packages in French and I failed my O level!


How do others manage medication side effects and wellbeing?

Fiz

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Re: Healthy Lifestyle Drop-in Centre
« Reply #13 on: 23 Jan 2022 01:45PM »
Steroids can increase hunger so a lot of people who take them gain weight on them but personally I haven't. In that I was fat and still am but am no fatter  :f_doh:


I think it's because I have never been overreplaced and have just been replacing my missing cortisol with an exact chemical replacement. I think my only risk times were when double dosing for sickness, injury or stress and could have been overreplaced.


I really feel for people who have to take antipsychotics for example because they alter the hunger signals in the brain triggering constant hunger. It must be so hard, or impossible for most, to feel hungry and not respond to the urge to eat. I have to say that I hate my body shape so intensely that I have flat out refused any medication that is likely to cause weight gain. I just won't go there.


I think it's a juggle of what is a priority for us as individuals. When I gained secondary adrenal insufficiency due to the opioids and experienced extreme fatigue then found out that if you stop using opioids you can recover from the adrenal insufficiency I chose recovery rather than lower pain levels and stopped using opioids. I'n still debilitatingly fatigued as I am recovering from the adrenal insufficiency but hopefully that will improve within the next couple of years and I am in an awful lot more pain as I now no longer have any effective method of pain management. I know other people with painful conditions who gained adrenal insufficiency have chosen to remain steroid dependant with the adrenal insufficiency in order to lessen their pain so we're all individuals with our own choices.


If the medication was working you'd have the same dilemma but if it's not helping your migraines then this hunger may not be a long term problem that you have to contemplate on which thing is most important to you. Do you know if this new drug usually works quickly or whether it normally takes a period of time before it starts to take effect? I hope that you're speaking to the neurologist early in February so that you know soon whether if it was going to work it would've worked by now so can stop it sooner rather than later as it's made things worse. Actually I wonder if it's worth contacting the neurologist's secretary to pose that question rather than wait for that appointment?

Sunny Clouds

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Re: Healthy Lifestyle Drop-in Centre
« Reply #14 on: 23 Jan 2022 05:35PM »
I have some very strong views on medication, but they're not a simple pro/anti.  They also relate to other 'substances' we eat, drink, smoke or whatever.

I'm going to go growly 'bigpharma/big industry & money.

I think lots of medication, maybe most medication, that is currently prescribed, is really useful, just as are lots of substances such as most of the basic foods/ingredients we eat etc.  But I also believe that for a very long time, people/companies wanting to make money have variously selected, cross-bred, tampered with etc. what they sell, then given us inadequate or inaccurate information about it.

Forgive me for using an example that's a food not a medication, but the principle is the same so I'll use it.  Research has shown that the potato that was the subsistence potato in Ireland at the time of the Hunger/famine, the Lumper, was far higher in protein than modern potatoes and also far higher in protein than the potatoes they farmed for export.  Yes, even back then, the potato industry had worked out that it was easier to get their customers hooked on potatoes bred to be high-carb.

No, this isn't a lecture on low-carb.  And I doubt whether 'carbs' etc. would have meant much.  It's about finding the product people will buy and selling it.  Don't forget that the potato industry overlapped in terms of money & powerful people with the sugar trade, the tobacco trade etc.

And so it is these days.  We focus on the foods.  Is it high carb, is it highly processed, is it whatever.  But what about the medication?

Yes, we get warned about side-effects.  Do we actually understand them or why?  It was me that worked out  by looking up stuff online and a bit of guesswork and experimentation that worked out that it was my 'mood stabilisers' (used by other sorts of doctors as 'anti-epileptics' and 'anti-inflammatories') impairing the function of the pancreas that had led to my needing a white cane and then, when I sussed I needed vitamin A but the meds were messed around with, a flood of other neurological symptoms that my neurologist now agrees were probably mostly related to vitamin E problems.

So then we have what Fiz has said about antipsychotics.  I believe that psychosis is often (but definitely not always) caused and/or triggered by life experiences and social environment.  How would triggering massive weight gain or a daily battle to avoid it help someone cope?  They're already socially excluded by their illness and society's attitudes (think how in America they typically now refer not to 'psychiatry' or 'mental health' but to 'behavioural medicine') and then in a fat-shaming society, the people around them are given yet another excuse to see them as having behavioural problems and a lack of self-restraint.

Further, research by a New Zealander (I forget her qualifications - psychiatrist?  biologist?) into SSRI antidepressants revealed that whether they help, do precious little, or send you mad depends largely on how much of certain enzymes your body produces and how much of those enzymes you are using for other things.  She revolutionised the world's understanding of the role of enzymes and now if you look in Wikipedia, you can find whole charts showing enzymes and what foods, medicines etc. they're relevant to.  But did you ever get a doctor offering you a genetic or enzyme-level test before prescribing a medication?

So I'm whilst I make use of a range of medications, prescription and non-prescription, I'm always very sceptical about whether we're given the full information about anything, and very aware that my response to them may not be the same as other people's response.

Ironically, I'm posting this just after watching a video on Youtube in which a doctor was talking about how individual our reaction to foods and also to the time of day we eat food is, which in my mind brought me full-circle to the Irish lumper potato.  Potatoes can be great foods, but if we look at history and think of people using them as a primary food source, we have to remember they weren't eating the same potatoes.

The other thing is that when antipsychotics were introduced, they were introduced as 'major tranquillisers' but later re-branded as 'antipsychotics'.  (I tell people this a lot so can't remember whether I've said it here recently.)  I think we'd be making far more sensible use of them if they hadn't been re-branded for marketing purposes.

Anyway, here endeth a long 'lecture' on how I think drugs, like foods, can be great so long as we personally find they help and fend of those that think that what works for one person will work for everyone, and so long as we remember that just because two drugs are in the same 'category' they work the same or will suit us the same.
(I'm an obsessive problem-solver, so feel free to ignore any suggestions or solutions I offer, even if they sound terribly insistent.)