Author Topic: Oral statement on PIP (life time awards DLA not doing reviews till 2015).  (Read 4637 times)

pooldenver

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could be good news for people who have life time awards DLA not doing reviws  till 2015.
bit more brething space maybe!
http://www.dwp.gov.uk/newsroom/ministers-speeches/2012/13-12-12.shtml

edit > I changed the title of the thread to make it easier for people to find PIP infomation > SM
« Last Edit: 27 Dec 2012 11:58AM by SunshineMeadows »

Dic Penderyn

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Re: Oral statement on Personal Independence Payment
« Reply #1 on: 13 Dec 2012 02:33PM »
Well that is good news for me at least but not everyone sadly. Hopefully by then the condem government will just be a painful memory.
Be careful in what you wish for, God has a sense of humour

Meridi

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Re: Oral statement on Personal Independence Payment
« Reply #2 on: 13 Dec 2012 04:50PM »
More details in full response to DLA consultation;

http://www.dwp.gov.uk/consultations/2012/pip.shtml

It also helps those on ILF as we cannot get that unless we qualify for high rate DLA care.

But its just a delay, some disabled people may also be helped by reaching retirment age in this timescale, currently they can still get DLA as is.

I truly hope a change of government will change this 'program' of annialation by assessments :-(

JLRRAC

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Re: Oral statement on Personal Independence Payment
« Reply #3 on: 13 Dec 2012 05:24PM »
"Importantly, unless they report a change in their condition, those with a lifetime or indefinite DLA award will not be reassessed until October 2015 at the earliest"

Apart from this meaning I will be able to pay off the remainder of my hire purchase deal with Peugeot Finance for my car, which I suppose I am supposed to be all happy and chuffed about, I see this as another attempt to divide and conquer.

Those fortunate to, like me, have life-time/indefinite awards will be expected to be less vocal in their condemnation of these welfare reforms leaving our fellow disability claimants to fight the reforms themselves. Then of course come 2015 we'll all be in it again fighting together to protect what little welfare benefits were have left to fight for.

But by this time if the government are able to have diluted the numbers fighting these reforms previously our voices will become lessened in strength and volume as the media will have heard only those being affected directly by the innitial impact of the PiP process fighting their battle on their own. We need to stay together, helping each other as we fight these welfare reforms and their unfairness to the weakest in society.

JLRRAC

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Re: Oral statement on Personal Independence Payment
« Reply #4 on: 13 Dec 2012 07:21PM »
4.16
While it may seem that this ‘50 per cent rule’ sets a high threshold, we consider that it is in fact a more generous provision than currently exists in DLA – the PIP assessment considers the impact experienced on the ‘majority of days rather than the ‘majority of the time’ as in DLA. This means that if a descriptor applies at any point during a 24 hour period, it is considered to apply for the entire day, whereas in DLA it would have to apply for the ‘majority of the day’ in order to apply. In addition, the PIP assessment allows descriptors to be combined to meet the 50 per cent rule, as a result of this we believe that 50 per cent of days is a reasonable threshold to consider.

So tough luck if your knee cap dislocates 3 times a week

4.20
Many respondents raised concern that the 50 per cent rule would mean that individuals who have short but severe periods of impact over a year will not be able to receive support from the benefit. However, the policy intent for PIP is that the benefit should support those individuals who have a long-term health condition or impairment that affects them most of the time. The Government believes that its proposals already achieve this and does not intend that the benefit should meet support needs arising from short, acute periods of impairment.

So where does that leave someone who has the constant probability of limb dislocation?

However, the risk that a serious adverse event may occur due to impairments is insufficient – the adverse event has to be likely to occur.

May/Might? aren't they the same flipping thing? >angry<
« Last Edit: 14 Dec 2012 10:00AM by JLR »

AndMac

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Re: Oral statement on Personal Independence Payment
« Reply #5 on: 14 Dec 2012 12:59AM »
I'm an indefinite HRM, zero care, so this wasn't the worst news I've had this year, but it doesn't mean I shall take my eye off the ball. Given this Govt's capacity for U turns and reconsiderations I shall watch very warily.
The new self-employed 'you WILL earn the minimum wage"  rules are not such good news, but I vented on those elsewhere.
 
"I might repeat to myself slowly and soothingly, a list of quotations beautiful from minds profound - if I can remember any of the damn things".

Dorothy Parker

Prabhakari

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Re: Oral statement on Personal Independence Payment
« Reply #6 on: 14 Dec 2012 04:13AM »
If they lose the election, it will look good for the future.
If they should (shudder) win the election, they can always 'review' the policy.
From 'The N.H.S. is safe in our hands' party.
Bless 'em all, bless 'em all,
The long and the short and the tall.

JLRRAC

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Re: Oral statement on Personal Independence Payment
« Reply #7 on: 14 Dec 2012 10:07AM »
"If they lose the election, it will look good for the future."

And if Labour win the future will look as it does now BAD!  Labour will be doing just as this government are doing, this government will do as Labour are doing now. Sadly I doubt the colour of government is going to be of any help to us, they do not see us as of any great importance, not enough MP seats at risk from disabled voters voting against them unlike the fear the main parties, particularly the Tories, have of such as the pensioner vote.

Pentesalie

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Re: Oral statement on Personal Independence Payment
« Reply #8 on: 14 Dec 2012 04:09PM »
McVey's grinning inainly in the Inde saying that more than 300,000 will have their benefits cut.

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/politics/more-than-300000-disabled-people-to-have-benefits-cut-says-esther-mcvey-8413498.html

ditchdwellers

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Re: Oral statement on Personal Independence Payment
« Reply #9 on: 14 Dec 2012 04:37PM »
It concerns me that a figure has been announced as to how many people will be entitled to PIP, before assessments have taken place.  I feel deeply for those who will be among the first to be assessed as I can see it being a complete fiasco with many appeals.  I'm one of those with indefinite DLA, so won't be one of those assessed immediately.  I'm not sure I will meet the criteria for enhanced mobility PIP, so I may have to make alternative arrangements for my car.

JLRRAC

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Re: Oral statement on Personal Independence Payment
« Reply #10 on: 14 Dec 2012 05:10PM »
"I may have to make alternative arrangements for my car."

It was because I saw what was coming re the PiP experiment that I decided not to do as I had been doing for a few years and trade in my car around the three year mark, avoiding the need for mot's or having to buy new tyres. I think I clear the balance of my hp payments on my present 207sw in 2014/5 so at least I'll have a car under my backside. But what about those who are on the Motability Hire scheme? 

What is going to happen in car dealerships the length of the country when, for fear of being reassessed within 3 years and losing Mobility entitlement, no one turns up looking to take a car on using the hire scheme?  That's a lot of salesmen and women losing their jobs not to mention the reduction is sales of cars to the disabled market.

Sunny Clouds

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Re: Oral statement on Personal Independence Payment
« Reply #11 on: 16 Dec 2012 01:37AM »
If I've read the criteria right, I'll keep my lower rate mobility but lose my higher rate care.  I scored myself at just one point below what I'd need for care. 

I'm less bothered by the loss of DLA as by the loss of the accompanying premiums.  I could do with quite a bit less than I get now, but I'll find it rather unpleasant on just ESA plus maybe standard rate mobility. 

My argument over the years has been that it's cheaper for the government to pay DLA than to pay for crisis care, but the government can't get its head round what's going to happen when disabled people all round the place are struggling financially.

At the risk of touching on a delicate subject, there has been much criticism of Cameron over claiming DLA for his son then abolishing it for others, but it does seem to me that his son was so severely disabled that he can't get his head round the notion that people not so obviously disabled might need a lot of help.

There's going to be a lot of destitution before this government's through.
(I'm an obsessive problem-solver, so feel free to ignore any suggestions or solutions I offer, even if they sound terribly insistent.)

JLRRAC

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Re: Oral statement on Personal Independence Payment
« Reply #12 on: 16 Dec 2012 10:40AM »
"the government can't get its head round what's going to happen when disabled people all round the place are struggling financially."

The government don't give a rat's dick about how the disabled cope with these changes, they, the government, are doing very nicely without concerning themselves about the impact of what they are doing.

So far as Cameron claiming DLA for his disabled son goes had he been a punter from Glasgow's Easterhouse estate who won a million(s) on the lottery he would have had Dom Littlewood featuring him as a scrounger on S&S. 

Meridi

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Re: Oral statement on Personal Independence Payment
« Reply #13 on: 17 Dec 2012 04:07PM »
I do not think there will a them and us response to the delay in assessments for those with indefinate awards of DLA till 2015.

We all face so many issues, I think those on here and other groups will still be supportive and help where we can.

For me its just one small delay, there is still the ESA assessmnet for many of us which can often lead to reduction or ending of DLA

Also care reviews which often mean care cuts

the housing benifit cap and bedroom tax issue to fight in next few months

And closure of ILF in 2015.

Sure there is many more.

We will be here because we see beyond the hypocrosy and divide and rule tactics of this grovernment.

And I see no end even if we get this government out, we will be targets or scapegoats as that histiorically what happens in an economic downturn.

But we do have few more legal rights which can be used to fight back individually and as groups
Read this info for more facts on legal rights

http://www.disabilityrightsuk.org/usingthelawtofightcuts.htm

KizzyKazaer

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Re: Oral statement on Personal Independence Payment
« Reply #14 on: 17 Dec 2012 07:22PM »
...there is still the ESA assessmnet for many of us which can often lead to reduction or ending of DLA

Has anyone here actually been affected by this, ie had their DLA award altered as a direct result of an ESA decision?