Author Topic: shared stairway refused stair lift by downstairs neibours  (Read 6219 times)

bobstar2888

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can anyone shed some light on this foe me please? my dad can hardly walk and has become blind, he owns his house out right and wants to fit a chair lift up the 2 flights of stairs to his front door but the neighbour had refuse saying that the bank owns his house and wont let my dad install this chair lift can anyone help me find out if there is anything we can do too go a head anyway?

auntieCtheM

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Hello,

Am I right, this is a modern block of flats?  or is it an old house that has been converted into flats?

Your first port of call should be the local council and their social services department.  You can phone the duty officer during the day and explain your dilemma.  They should sent an occupational therapist round to have a look and they can make all sorts of suggestions about adaptations your father may benefit from.

hossylass

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If it is flats then the flats themselves will be leasehold, unless all the house holders have bought the freehold amongst themselves.
Essentially the shared access belongs to the whoever owns the freehold, and it is their decision.
You can usually tell because there will be a service charge for maintaining the shared areas, which can be a minimal amount.

So basically, who owns the stairs?!!!

hossylass

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And welcome to Ouchtoo Bobstar >biggrin<

devine63

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Hi
in searching for an answer I found this - potentially very useful report from 2007 on getting better outcomes by making housing  adaptations
http://odi.dwp.gov.uk/docs/res/il/better-outcomes-report.pdf

however apart from this

- you will need specialist advice from a lawyer, I think.  I could not find anything readily available on shared housing situations like the one you describe.   The Centre for Accessible Environments might be able to answer your query, but I think they charge for consultations.

- another thing that is worth looking at is whether a stair lift is the only possible solution?   e.g. instead it might be possible to add a lift to the building (e.g. sometimes this can be done by building a new lift shaft on the outside of the existing building and having the lift doors open through what is currently a window or even cutting a new lift doorway through a wall)

regards, Deb

TemporallyLoopy

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I would imagine that it is going to be pretty difficult to get agreement if it is a small leasehold property because surely once the stairlift was installed in a communal area it would become the responsibility of the management company (or of the tenants) to ensure that it is not damaged in any way, for example by children playing with it. 

If the main property housing the stairlift is shared there is no guarantee that someone else will not use (or attempt to use) the stairlift and I am sure that there would need to be some kind of additional insurance to cover that, at the very least.

There is also the point of course that some staircases, and the layout of doorways into neighbouring properties, may not be suitable for setting up a stairlift to go up two flights of stairs.

T.Loopy
Life is what happens to you when you're making other plans.

(Betty Talmadge, b. 1924)

auntieCtheM

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Hi Bobstar,

Hello, are you there?  What do you think of our suggestions?

Sunny Clouds

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Further thoughts - the OP refers to their dad owning a 'house' and then refers to downstairs neighbours.  Could this be a maisonette?  I ask because if so, although it would be a single building, there'd be separate entrances like semi-detached houses, not a communal hallway.  I agree with those who say it's important to clarify who owns what, whether it's leasehold or commonhold or whatever and how much is shared space and who owns that. 

(I'm an obsessive problem-solver, so feel free to ignore any suggestions or solutions I offer, even if they sound terribly insistent.)

bobstar2888

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they are old flats with a stairwell on the back of the property, there is only my parents and there neibours thanks for all the help.

 

hossylass

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Ah yep, I know the type.

Have you applied for a disabled facilities grant? Has someone from social services been out and assessed your Father?

catspjs

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I had to notify in writing intension to do work to one step on our com close. And I say notify not get consent.  the OT dealt with planning and building conscent and next door was simply written to with the plans.      they could have put in an appeal but with it being a needed disabled adaptation that I had already been assessed.  they had to have a better reason than "I dont like it"  and the 2nd point in my favour was that it was at MY end of the shared close and not at their door. 

the only problem I think they would be is the width of your hall and safe getting on/off point on the top/bottom.   

Get a OT and remember their is lots of various types of stairlift.    My pals lift is offset to an angle due to narrow hall. 
Mine has a riser function to stand my up and the bottom section of the rail is hinged as it over hangs a door downstairs(it flips up when the lift is not at the bottom)

Stairlifts are by far a cheaper option and cause no damage to a property, so the bank shouldnt be an issue. 

 

« Last Edit: 07 Apr 2012 01:20PM by catspjs »