Author Topic: Covid jab  (Read 3248 times)

Sunny Clouds

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Re: Covid jab
« Reply #75 on: 15 Oct 2021 05:25PM »
Aargh.

I saw a couple of doctors at my GP surgery a couple of days ago and made a point of telling them how appreciative I am, but I'm even more appreciative now.  I wish you had a good surgery to register with.  I know hugs from Ouchers aren't a substitute for meds, appointments, access, adjustments etc., but it's all I can offer.

 :big_hugs: :big_hugs:

(I'm an obsessive problem-solver, so feel free to ignore any suggestions or solutions I offer, even if they sound terribly insistent.)

Fiz

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Re: Covid jab
« Reply #76 on: 16 Oct 2021 06:13PM »
I had my fortnightly phone consult with my GP on Thursday and we decided to move to four weekly appointments. She said half their appointments are now face to face so I actually booked a face to face which is going to feel weird having not really seem her for 18 months. Could things be slowly returning to normal?


The chemist is adjacent to the surgery so a face to face makes sense as it's one excursion to see the GP and get my medication.

Sunny Clouds

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Re: Covid jab
« Reply #77 on: 16 Oct 2021 08:45PM »
My GP already did telephone triage before the pandemic and I think he does video-wotsit, but I've never done that, only the telephone triage.

To be fair, I have been into my GP surgery twice in the pandemic to have flu jabs, but my annual review this year was by phone. 

I don't think things will return to normal in the sense of going back to how they were before, because so far as I can tell, the stress of aggressive patients during the pandemic plus all the extra work has led to a significant drop in GP numbers, and I think a significant proportion of those that came out of retirement to help with the pandemic will leave again within the next year or so.

It beats me how GPs cope with all the nastiness politicians and the media throw at them, and how GP surgeries like mine provide such a good service is bewildering.  Mind you, over the decades, they've been brilliant at being creative.  They don't just provide clinical services, they provide space for non-clinical services such as a benefits & finance adviser.  It's closed at the moment, but they also have a prayer room. 

Sudden thought - usually when I go to see my GP, I get offered a cuppa while I'm waiting.  That's not happening now.  I think I should complain to my MP.  At least other GPs stick to being conventional and not having enough seats or enough appointments but mine's fussing over crockery hygiene.  Harumph!

Meanwhile, I hope your face-to-face will be weird only a bit and will feel ok when you get there.
(I'm an obsessive problem-solver, so feel free to ignore any suggestions or solutions I offer, even if they sound terribly insistent.)

Fiz

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Re: Covid jab
« Reply #78 on: 20 Oct 2021 08:39PM »
I tried to book my Covid booster online today but it asked me if I am a frontline health and care worker and I said no and it then said that I can't book my booster yet. My area is slow. I guess I am anxious as I am going to stay with my sister for 48 hours this weekend and during that time attending a grandchild's birthday celebration with 45 guests and I don't normally mix or socialise so I would have felt reassured had I been able to have my booster before this weekend.


One friend of mine has Covid for the third time and another friend has it for the second. The friend with the third bout doesn't even work but does have a school child who will be a transmitter.


I want my booster asap really so as to feel safer.

Fiz

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Re: Covid jab
« Reply #79 on: 24 Oct 2021 08:50AM »
I had a text and email yesterday inviting me to book my booster so I am having mine on Wednesday.

Fiz

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Re: Covid jab
« Reply #80 on: 27 Oct 2021 03:04PM »
Well, I am all boostered up now. I'm slightly dubious as I only just felt the needle break the skin and certainly didn't feel it go in my arm but I wasn't watching and am sure it was done correctly! 5 hours after the vaccine and I felt exhausted suddenly but I did increase my steroids to cope with a busy weekend away and have been back on my lower dose for the third day now so it could be the drop in steroids as 5 hours sounds like a flipping quick reaction to a vaccine though feeling tired is the most common vaccine side effect.


My local area which is rural has a current 50% increase on the previous highest record numbers of positive cases which is massive. An ICU nurse from the city hospital though goes to my church and there are only a couple of Covid cases in ICU and cases on only one medical ward and they are all young adults to middle aged almost all of which have not been vaccinated so the vaccines do seem to be keeping people out of hospital though case rates are sky high. I do feel safer having had the booster.

Sunny Clouds

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Re: Covid jab
« Reply #81 on: 27 Oct 2021 04:02PM »
I'm jealous!

Well, only a bit because I didn't have my second jab until June so I'm not due my booster yet.

Oh hang on, does that mean we can't get rid of you?  Oh well, maybe you'll catch something else instead.  Had you thought of some new mutation of something old?  Something with really pretty spots to match the flowers on your coffin?

Joking apart, I'm glad you're triple-jabbed now.
(I'm an obsessive problem-solver, so feel free to ignore any suggestions or solutions I offer, even if they sound terribly insistent.)

Fiz

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Re: Covid jab
« Reply #82 on: 28 Oct 2021 12:35AM »
Flowers on my coffin what a lovely thought. I will have to update my funeral plan!  :f_laugh:

Sunny Clouds

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Re: Covid jab
« Reply #83 on: 28 Oct 2021 01:47PM »
I don't want a funeral as such, but if someone decides to give me a send-off instead of just shipping my body off to the crem, I hope it'll be brief, with lots of humour and, most importantly, a good party after for those that turn up.
(I'm an obsessive problem-solver, so feel free to ignore any suggestions or solutions I offer, even if they sound terribly insistent.)

Fiz

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Re: Covid jab
« Reply #84 on: 28 Oct 2021 06:34PM »
I expect my send off will be at the crem during the alloted 20 minutes. Hopefully whoever attends will slope off to the pub afterwards. My mother was an avid environmentalist so we deliberately chose a recycled cardboard floral coffin for her cremation thinking she'd have been mortified (I realise she already was) had she thought a tree had died to be burned with her. However that was quite a bit dearer than the cheapest plywood coffin! As I have prepaid my crematorium funeral I suspect my coffin will be cheap plywood, I can't see anyone paying extra to have floral cardboard. Aren't we a cheerful pair 🤣

Fiz

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Re: Covid jab
« Reply #85 on: 28 Oct 2021 06:37PM »
It's been confirmed that vaccines only protect yourself rather than others
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-59077036

ditchdwellers

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Re: Covid jab
« Reply #86 on: 29 Oct 2021 09:11AM »
I'm pleased you've had the booster too Fiz. How are you feeling now?


The latest news on transmission between vaccinated people in the same household is interesting. I regularly look after my grandchildren and neither my son or daughter in law is vaccinated. I'm not entirely sure the reasoning they have chosen not to be, however I think my daughter in law is seriously considering it. This latest news may change their minds. It certainly makes me very wary about going there every week as I would never forgive myself if I inadvertently passed Covid onto them.


I feel like we're all caught in a very difficult position where unless we put our lives completely on hold, then we won't be able to do anything. All I can do is take precautions, wear a mask in public places, and keep washing my hands. And hope everyone else does the same.

Sunny Clouds

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Re: Covid jab
« Reply #87 on: 29 Oct 2021 12:47PM »
I think the way the statistics on vaccinated people passing on the virus are presented in the media is unhelpful, which can cause people to underestimate some risks or misperceive what the risks are.

Here's how I see it.

Vaccination is often presented as if it stops you getting infected, whereas it doesn't prevent it, it reduces the risk of it, that risk varying according to virus variant, and generally, but not always, dramatically reduces the severity of symptoms and risk of dying.  In particular, it can increase the likelihood that if you get it, you will be symptomless.

Like anyone else, if you're not infected, then you're not passing the virus on in the most common ways of doing so, eg. spewing forth infected matter from your lungs, or via what you touch after coughing etc.  So in terms of proportion of a period of time that you'll be infected, you're a risk to others in that way for less time, e.g. fewer months in the year.

But people may significantly underestimate the risk they pose in terms of being infected and infecting others. 

People may not fully take on board that if vaccinated they can still be infected and thus pass on the virus.  Further, they may not fully take on board that having the vaccine may increase the risk of their not having any symptoms or any recognisable symptoms.  Thus they may be more likely to take less care and thus increase the likelihood of passing the virus on to others.

Meanwhile, even if not infected, you can still pass it on via what I'll call 'dirty hands' or 'ordinary poor hygiene' just as you can pass on a tummy bug without catching it yourself and I don't think that's being emphasised as much so people who are vaccinated may also grow careless about that.

Thus, as I see it, statistically having the vaccine reduces your risk of passing on the virus in terms of amount of time you yourself are infected, but that has to be offset against people being more likely to suppose that if they don't have symptoms they're not infected, and against people being more careless about general cleanliness than they would have been if not vaccinated.

That being said, history shows that having a lot of people vaccinated can contribute to protecting unvaccinated people, because the prevalence or non-prevalence of a virus can affect the risk of its mutating and if it does, how it mutates.  But that's all part of the complex issue of herd immunity, which certain politicians and spads have effectively mutated the meaning of so as to exclude from the term the concept of herd immunity by vaccine.  I don't usually wish people dead but I have found several times during the pandemic wishing certain proponents of their notion of herd immunity, which seems to be 'let the weak die', would drop dead themselves. 

(I'm an obsessive problem-solver, so feel free to ignore any suggestions or solutions I offer, even if they sound terribly insistent.)

ditchdwellers

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Re: Covid jab
« Reply #88 on: 03 Nov 2021 11:03AM »
My son has Covid. Neither he nor his wife have been vaccinated, I'm not sur why they have refused but things got a bit 'heated' when my husband tried talking to him about it so we didn't probe any further.
They are currently isolating along with their three children, all under 10 including a three month baby.


Apparently my son just feels like he has flu has at the moment and I'm hoping it doesn't get any worse or any family members get it.


I was there exactly a week ago looking after the children for the afternoon. I've been jabbed and boostered so hopefully I'll be ok and my husband has only spoken to our son on the phone for the last couple of weeks with no direct contact. He did pop in to see the grandchildren when he dropped me off but he had to shoot off so it was a flying visit. He's been double jabbed.


I'm very worried about them all. I wish they had been vaccinated.

Sunny Clouds

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Re: Covid jab
« Reply #89 on: 03 Nov 2021 12:51PM »
I hope none of them gets more than flu-like.

 :big_hugs:
(I'm an obsessive problem-solver, so feel free to ignore any suggestions or solutions I offer, even if they sound terribly insistent.)