Recent Posts

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1
News and Current Affairs. / Re: Does Starmer mean what he says?!
« Last post by Sunny Clouds on 19 Oct 2021 09:41PM »
I think I'd better back off.  I'm feeling rather fragile at the moment and don't want to overreact.
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News and Current Affairs. / Re: Does Starmer mean what he says?!
« Last post by Sunny Clouds on 19 Oct 2021 08:01PM »
OtE -

Having regard to your attitude towards Islington, with its high high level of severe deprivation and reliance on foodbanks, and other voluntary donations of free essentials, free help, free social care etc. freely given by others in the same community, in the absence of the good (albeit not perfect) welfare state this country had for a few decades, if the desire of the people there for inclusiveness, which, living in a different urban area further north I can also relate to, then you give the impression, OtE, of living in a somewhat privileged community/social environment, which might explain the voting habits, or rather non-voting habits of the people where you live that you refer to.

As for an area with lots of non-Brits, well I'll admit to a bias, living as I do in an urban area which has for a long time relied on not only locals but incomers. 

Whether it was Norman invaders who saw fit to build a church near me, and contributed to the local church-based welfare state for centuries, or all those that helped build our trade and our environment, be that Dutch (including during the Boer War) and South Asians (before and after Independence and the Partition) and Irish (including during the Hunger, the War of Independence, and the Emergency), and Poles (usually thought of as during WW2, but also before and after), and Jews (that braved centuries of persecution and still do), and people from a whole range of other parts of the world, particularly parts colonised and exploited at the behest of those with power and influence in this country...I live somewhere where being English means being a mixture of centuries of blending locals with newcomers who braved hostility to contribute to what we are and what we have.

My favourite Christian song goes back to my younger days.  "When I needed a neighbour, were you there...and the creed and the colour and the name don't matter, were you there?"  There's a verse "When I needed a healer..."  When I was a child, I had a GP who was an immigrant.  Like many Jewish immigrants, he braved antisemitism to come here.  Without him, I wouldn't have survived childhood.  My current GP's family is from Uganda.  We left a mess there by colonising, bringing lots of Indians, particuarly Gujaratis, creating nasty racial and social division instead of unity, then so very many people saying "Not our problem" when it resulted in yet another bloodbath.

And me?  Well, I'm English born as were both my parents, but like most people where I come from, I've got bits of foreign in me. Didn't stop this country asking me to defend it.  Didn't stop me putting my life on the line again and again.  This country's terribly good at saying "Please come and help us" then "Bog off, we don't need you any more.  Yes, we know you've now cut your ties with where your family came from and you've nothing to go home to, but you shouldn't have believed our urgings to come here and help us out."  People who aren't wholly indigenous are treated as British so long as they're wanted, but as foreign when they're not.  At least I'm English & British enough not to be turfed out unless and until someone gets all ethnic about it instead of nationalist.

But then I live in a country where a significant proportion of leading politicians from various political parties have got bits of foreign, and I swore an oath of allegiance to a queen with foreign origins as well as British.

I really wish I hadn't engaged in conversation with you, OtE.  I wasn't aware of your views in relation to immigration and ethnicity. 

It will not stop me, when walking down the street where I live, alive and safe, being thankful for the centuries upon centuries of immigrants that are the people that are now my neighbours.  When I need a neighbour, they're there.

OtE, I have found it interesting to debate with you, but I now feel very uncomfortable.  I'd always seen disability boards as places that favoured inclusion not objected to it.





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News and Current Affairs. / Re: Does Starmer mean what he says?!
« Last post by Fiz on 19 Oct 2021 01:13PM »
I can't see Starmer winning an election however dire our current government is. He's not saying or doing the things that need saying and doing to lead people away from following the status quo. He's not a prospective Prime Minister in my view and the leader of a political party should be.


Backtracking on the conversation somewhat, a major problem of the majority of young people choosing to go to university is those that complete their degrees have a qualification they want to use for their employment. They're failing to get jobs in these fields and continue to wait for these positions relying on the bank of Mum and Dad to live on while we have a massive shortage of people working in hospitality, haulage, caring careers etc.


I don't have a massive real life group of connections but I know of three young people in exactly this position. One, the child of a close friend has an engineering degree and is becoming more and more depressed to a debilitating degree by his lack of gaining interviews for positions. He, and the other two that I know less well, won't entertain doing any other work/employment while waiting for their chosen career path to get going. Possibly encouraging so many young people to go to university is raising their aspirations to a level where it's creating employment vacancies that would previously have been filled by young people not going to university?


I think we could provide incentives for people with medical qualifications to remain in the NHS for 5 years which I think would mean far less would leave the NHS at that point.
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News and Current Affairs. / Re: Does Starmer mean what he says?!
« Last post by On the edge on 19 Oct 2021 11:50AM »
You are entitled to disagree with Labour and dislike Corbyn, but firstly, to describe his views as marxist would not be a fair description, whether in the academic sense, or either of the two main modern political senses.  He could reasonably have been thought to agree with some of Marx's views, thus supporting public services such as the NHS, whilst, unlike Marx, not objecting to the existence of private services, e.g. private healthcare as an extra option as opposed to an essential. 

Secondly, Momentum has never pushed for support for the UK to be like the USSR, not least because the USSR didn't stick true to the ideals it claimed to espouse, but veered off into those distortions of power and politics that can be seen when any state goes too far to the right or left. 

I find myself wondering how far you understand the difference between marxism, trotskyism, communism, socialism etc.  I'm rather supposing that you're on the right of the political spectrum.  Would you be happy if I confused pre-Chicago-boy neoliberalism with post-Chicago-boy neoliberalism?  Would you be happy if I confused the concepts of economic liberal and social liberal, or if I confused, say, American and British uses of the word liberal, with their distinct differences on the political spectrum?

But given Starmer's purge of the left wing of the party, and the politicians and strategists he is gathering round himself, it seems clear that he will be following New Labour, so we will see a furtherance of Tony Blair's privatisation of a range of public services and facilities.  To use the NHS as an example again, I see no reason to see that he wouldn't take steps to bring in further privatisations and outsourcing.

I find it interesting what you say about older people in Wales not changing their views and younger people being too busy to vote.  It's very different where I am.  All ages demonstrating, campaigning, organising, helping with voting etc. across the political spectrum.  Not being a member of the Labour party, I don't get to hear what goes on in their meetings, but I do know people who belong to it, just as I know members of other parties. 

Mind you, I know some people do get entrenched.  There's a local couple I know who are in their eighties and I've no idea what goes on their voting slips, but he's never going let her see him as anything other than Tory and she's never going to let him see her as anything other than Labour!

Oh well, things we're disagreeing on again.  Never mind, you can have a smile at my initial reaction to the use of Korbyn, thinking "But he's not red-haired.  Oh, it's the 'has a sense of humour' meme of Korbyn & Korbin he's referring to."  Finally, the penny dropped, red-haired as a play on red-politics.  I didn't get it at first because  I think of Korbyn as a fashionable American name, where politically our red is their blue!


There are very distinct differences between how the English vote and how the Scots/Irish and Welsh do. Wales we tend to view anything done in England is to our detriment really! (Not that I personally subscribe to that view, occasionally they recognise we exist).  We are currently discussing independence again.  The Labour party has done nothing for Wales, it is a relentless drag on progress.  But again Tories are the lowest life forms on the planet. as welsh are concerned.  Any politician that stands against them gets the welsh vote.  I remember reading of a town in Texas that elected a dog that was deceased as mayor because the locals loved the dog, not the old mayor.  Wales is a bit like that. Substitute sheep for dogs`.


I just think all this stuff emanating from Momentum/Islington or S E Counties is dangerous 'inclusive' nonsense that hasn't been thought out at all.  It's a mish-mash of extremes with common sense left out of it all.  The drive for independence (From Scots mostly), is as much a 'defence' against stupid decisions made in London being foisted on the rest of us.  While London is happy to have near half it population as non-brits, it is not a situation many are comfortable with.


It is just seen as a hotbed of demands from people who aren't like us, rarely mix with us,  and don't want the same as us either, own schools, own language provisions etc...  Obviously, the way you word these concerns gets the racist and discrimination tag by default.  Then it goes covert and real racism emerges.  The current Brit response is cest la vie then ignore it all, that is the brit way, which of course means demands others make, even reasonable ones, are getting lip-service that's all.  Like most, I get fed up trying to express concern then getting shouted down or called all manner of names instead.


I don't consider myself racist or discriminatory, nothing is black and white anyway and there is no universal cure-all that will work.  I don't know how many laws/acts/rules have been passed since 1900 but am guessing it a lot! That is ignoring the conveyor belt of do this or else we got as EU members as well.  Many were geared to equality, inclusion, and democracy, and the jury would still be well out as to how effective most were or ever will be.  Disabled had 5 in recent times we are still out of it.     


Reading current issues in media and elsewhere complete failure springs to mind, and increases in the polarisation of people and views.  The stock response of getting down on one knee seems then a bit ridiculous and pointless as well as offering 'red flags' to the racist bulls. 


My own disability was re-branded as something else, it's cause (And effects),  blamed on others and even the way I communicated was rewritten.  I was zeroed with the simple capitalisation of the single term for my issue.  It is a form of identity theft.  Keir wants Momentum out? he hasn't the clout to do it, and, labour challenged him in their own recent meetings and booed him Momentum are a rabble run by very adept stirrers basically.  Credited with the jokes of 'Please support Gay Whales' or 'one-armed black lesbians.'


Inclusion? NOT as we understand it.  So we vote for them telling us how to act and think instead of the tories?  THat isn't choice.
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News and Current Affairs. / Re: Does Starmer mean what he says?!
« Last post by Sunny Clouds on 18 Oct 2021 12:51PM »
You are entitled to disagree with Labour and dislike Corbyn, but firstly, to describe his views as marxist would not be a fair description, whether in the academic sense, or either of the two main modern political senses.  He could reasonably have been thought to agree with some of Marx's views, thus supporting public services such as the NHS, whilst, unlike Marx, not objecting to the existence of private services, e.g. private healthcare as an extra option as opposed to an essential. 

Secondly, Momentum has never pushed for support for the UK to be like the USSR, not least because the USSR didn't stick true to the ideals it claimed to espouse, but veered off into those distortions of power and politics that can be seen when any state goes too far to the right or left. 

I find myself wondering how far you understand the difference between marxism, trotskyism, communism, socialism etc.  I'm rather supposing that you're on the right of the political spectrum.  Would you be happy if I confused pre-Chicago-boy neoliberalism with post-Chicago-boy neoliberalism?  Would you be happy if I confused the concepts of economic liberal and social liberal, or if I confused, say, American and British uses of the word liberal, with their distinct differences on the political spectrum?

But given Starmer's purge of the left wing of the party, and the politicians and strategists he is gathering round himself, it seems clear that he will be following New Labour, so we will see a furtherance of Tony Blair's privatisation of a range of public services and facilities.  To use the NHS as an example again, I see no reason to see that he wouldn't take steps to bring in further privatisations and outsourcing.

I find it interesting what you say about older people in Wales not changing their views and younger people being too busy to vote.  It's very different where I am.  All ages demonstrating, campaigning, organising, helping with voting etc. across the political spectrum.  Not being a member of the Labour party, I don't get to hear what goes on in their meetings, but I do know people who belong to it, just as I know members of other parties. 

Mind you, I know some people do get entrenched.  There's a local couple I know who are in their eighties and I've no idea what goes on their voting slips, but he's never going let her see him as anything other than Tory and she's never going to let him see her as anything other than Labour!

Oh well, things we're disagreeing on again.  Never mind, you can have a smile at my initial reaction to the use of Korbyn, thinking "But he's not red-haired.  Oh, it's the 'has a sense of humour' meme of Korbyn & Korbin he's referring to."  Finally, the penny dropped, red-haired as a play on red-politics.  I didn't get it at first because  I think of Korbyn as a fashionable American name, where politically our red is their blue!

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News and Current Affairs. / Re: Does Starmer mean what he says?!
« Last post by On the edge on 18 Oct 2021 09:53AM »
I've lost patience with Labour, it is ironic they are making most noises in and around S E England and London, have all the extremes anyone could ever want, yet only Wales voted for them in office.  Wales traditionally hates tories historically so would vote for anyone but a tory regardless of how badly others perform.  As oldies cannot change their views and do vote, and younger voters are too busy on FB to vote the situation goes on and on. 

Not that I care who runs Labour into the ground they are a spent force and attract too many idiots. In reality, Momentum runs Labour an ultra left-wing arm of dubious nere do wells who want the UK like the old USSR was who favours Korbyn, another Marxist.

In Wales the first minister there still defies a leave decision of Brexit in Wales whose voters defied LAbour there, the first time they have.  Despite the welsh labour party defying its own electorate, they still prefer them to Tories.
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Talk / Re: Small wins
« Last post by SashaQ on 16 Oct 2021 09:35PM »
Well done Fiz - that's a great result  :thumbsup:
It is helpful to provide feedback to companies about their products and services, to the highest level if necessary.  I've been fortunate recently that the customer services departments have been very helpful when I reported a couple of faulty goods. I got vouchers for a replacement and they got information from me so they could check their processes to help ensure the problems didn't happen again.
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Health and Disability / Re: Covid jab
« Last post by Sunny Clouds on 16 Oct 2021 08:45PM »
My GP already did telephone triage before the pandemic and I think he does video-wotsit, but I've never done that, only the telephone triage.

To be fair, I have been into my GP surgery twice in the pandemic to have flu jabs, but my annual review this year was by phone. 

I don't think things will return to normal in the sense of going back to how they were before, because so far as I can tell, the stress of aggressive patients during the pandemic plus all the extra work has led to a significant drop in GP numbers, and I think a significant proportion of those that came out of retirement to help with the pandemic will leave again within the next year or so.

It beats me how GPs cope with all the nastiness politicians and the media throw at them, and how GP surgeries like mine provide such a good service is bewildering.  Mind you, over the decades, they've been brilliant at being creative.  They don't just provide clinical services, they provide space for non-clinical services such as a benefits & finance adviser.  It's closed at the moment, but they also have a prayer room. 

Sudden thought - usually when I go to see my GP, I get offered a cuppa while I'm waiting.  That's not happening now.  I think I should complain to my MP.  At least other GPs stick to being conventional and not having enough seats or enough appointments but mine's fussing over crockery hygiene.  Harumph!

Meanwhile, I hope your face-to-face will be weird only a bit and will feel ok when you get there.
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Health and Disability / Re: Covid jab
« Last post by Fiz on 16 Oct 2021 06:13PM »
I had my fortnightly phone consult with my GP on Thursday and we decided to move to four weekly appointments. She said half their appointments are now face to face so I actually booked a face to face which is going to feel weird having not really seem her for 18 months. Could things be slowly returning to normal?


The chemist is adjacent to the surgery so a face to face makes sense as it's one excursion to see the GP and get my medication.
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Talk / Re: Thank you for coping with my long posts
« Last post by On the edge on 16 Oct 2021 11:42AM »
 :biggrin:
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