Author Topic: Advising Patients About Work  (Read 3338 times)

AccessOfficer

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Advising Patients About Work
« on: 25 Apr 2013 02:37PM »

Look at what I found on the D.W.P Corporate website!! listed under "Advice for healthcare professionals"

Role of healthcare professionals:

"Only a minority of people with health problems have severe disability that will result in a complete inability to work. The majority of people have less severe disability and with the right support should be able to undertake appropriate work."

"Healthcare professionals are in a unique position to provide advice about work, which is an important part of clinical management."

An evidence-based approach for General Practitioners and other healthcare professionals.

Work is good for health
"Work is an integral part of life, which is central to individual identity, social roles and social status, as well as meeting financial and psychosocial needs."

For people with common health problems, there is strong evidence that work:

• promotes recovery and aids rehabilitation
• leads to better health outcomes
• minimises the harmful physical, mental and social effects of long-term sickness absence
• improves quality of life and well-being
• reduces social exclusion and poverty

Unemployment is bad for health

There is strong evidence that long periods out of work can cause or contribute to:

• higher consultation, medication consumption and hospital admission rates
• 2 to 3 times increased risk of poor general health
• 2 to 3 times increased risk of mental health problems
• 20% excess mortality

"The longer anyone is off work, the lower their chances of getting back to work.
These health risks are greater than many "Killer diseases" or some of the most dangerous jobs in the construction industry or the North Sea.

Overall, the beneficial effects of work outweigh the risks of work, and are greater than the harmful effects of being out of work."

http://www.dwp.gov.uk/docs/hwwb-health-work-gp-leaflet.pdf

That's me told then!!!

Regards
AO

Dic Penderyn

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Re: Advising Patients About Work
« Reply #1 on: 25 Apr 2013 03:41PM »
Quote
The majority of people have less severe disability and with the right support should be able to undertake appropriate work."

Yet they are steadfastly doing their best to remove and undermine that support.

The person who wrote all that should get the ignorant twat of the year award (present company excepted of course just in case)

They take a truth and twist it till its inside out and upside down.
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ATurtle

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Re: Advising Patients About Work
« Reply #2 on: 25 Apr 2013 03:59PM »
Quote
minimises the harmful physical, mental and social effects of long-term sickness absence

Erm, the one day a week I do voluntary work screws my body up for the rest of the week. 

The work that I do, increases my physical harm as I sometimes have to walk away from my desk for photocopying etc. hence exacerbating the physical pain.

The realisation that my physical state is decreasing affects my mental status.

The fact that two or three days after my work day are spent in bed away from people and the day before on very light stuf means I have to keep myself away from society who expect morethan I can give puts a right mocker on social contacts.

OK, without the one day a week, I would be a morose mess, depressed as I gave nothing back to society.  So am I better off working than not?
Tony.

"I choose not to place "DIS", in my ability." - Robert M. Hensel

myrtlemaid

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Re: Advising Patients About Work
« Reply #3 on: 25 Apr 2013 04:29PM »
Im not sure that GPs willbe any use at advising people about work..many seem to have little real understanding about how a certain condition /s will effect peoples everyday lives and so will have little understanding about how an individual with a condition/s will be able to work.

Tobe able to give good advice aGP would need to know individual patients far better than most do the way their illness/ disability effects them AND know what tasks an employee would need to do to do the jb and then understand how the one effected the other.
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ATurtle

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Re: Advising Patients About Work
« Reply #4 on: 25 Apr 2013 04:45PM »
So, conversely Myrtlemaid, how can a clerical officer be advising people about work .. many seem to have little real understanding about how a certain condition/s will effect peoples everyday lives and so will have little understanding about how an individual with a condition will be able to work.

To be able to give good advice a LC+ clerk would need to know a lot more about medicine and the individual claimants far better than most do the way their illness/ disability effects them AND know what tasks an employee would need to do to do the job and then understand how the one effected the other.

There are very few people that know enough about both the workplace and the effects of disabilities/conditions.  The only way to divine the ability of a claimant is, in many cases, to get them to do the job. 
Tony.

"I choose not to place "DIS", in my ability." - Robert M. Hensel

auntieCtheM

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Re: Advising Patients About Work
« Reply #5 on: 25 Apr 2013 07:40PM »
If you are doing a job that you like, that supports you and trains you and is a positive, fulfilling, place to be, then maybe yes.

But how many people have a job like that?

In many jobs people are scrambling about trying to get on and will stamp on the next persons face if necessary to move upwards in the hierarchy.  One has to be well and fit to cope with such office politics and do the job as well.  And come home and do all that is necessary there too.  That description is just so idealistic.

devine63

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Re: Advising Patients About Work
« Reply #6 on: 25 Apr 2013 11:44PM »
just one problem ...

"There is strong evidence that long periods out of work can cause or contribute to:"

there is no such thing.   There may be some correlations between these things, but a correlation cannot establish causes or contributors.

regards, Deb

seegee

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Re: Advising Patients About Work
« Reply #7 on: 27 Apr 2013 05:21PM »
Well said, Deb. 

Long periods out of work may be caused by, or contributed to, by poor health. 
Whether that poor health is mental, physical or both it may contribute to increased mortality.
Poor health begets poor health too; if you're too ill to shop for or prepare nutritious food it's likely you will take longer to recover and might get new problems associated with malnutrition.

SashaQ

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Re: Advising Patients About Work
« Reply #8 on: 27 Apr 2013 06:42PM »
If you are doing a job that you like, that supports you and trains you and is a positive, fulfilling, place to be, then maybe yes.

But how many people have a job like that?

Indeed - in fact the original report didn't say "Work is good for health", it actually said, "Good work is good for health", but government quotes have conveniently dropped that first crucial word...

I am lucky that my job has now settled down, so it is generally fulfilling and positive, but there have been times when my mental or physical health was threatened by what was expected of me...

Yes, unemployment is tough, as self esteem is eroded by rejection after rejection, but work is not automatically a cure.

lankou

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Re: Advising Patients About Work
« Reply #9 on: 27 Apr 2013 06:47PM »


"Only a minority of people with health problems have severe disability that will result in a complete inability to work. The majority of people have less severe disability and with the right support should be able to undertake appropriate work."


Unum wrote that, not the DWP.

sherbs

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Re: Advising Patients About Work
« Reply #10 on: 27 Apr 2013 09:14PM »
If you are doing a job that you like, that supports you and trains you and is a positive, fulfilling, place to be, then maybe yes.

But how many people have a job like that?

In many jobs people are scrambling about trying to get on and will stamp on the next persons face if necessary to move upwards in the hierarchy.  One has to be well and fit to cope with such office politics and do the job as well.  And come home and do all that is necessary there too.  That description is just so idealistic.

Totally agree auntie

While i enjoy my 3 days at work, I really do not feel that i get the support of our "New" manager, as we have merged with 2 other cmhts, she now manages us all, ( and is also totally new to how the nhs works).

As we have merged there are now 7 admin as opposed to 5 of us, so we had to move to a larger office so we could all be together.  We moved last october and i have yet to have a desk assessment.  I have asked her, emailed her you name i have done it.

She eventually emailed me back, saying "i understand you want a desk assessment" etc,  I emailed her back, saying "i actually need a desk assessment urgently", as i know i am not sitting correctly, anyway long story..... blah blah blah. 

I totally understand the new manager is extra busy as we all are but still no bl...y desk assessment.

So auntie, happy in my job, well yes sometimes, but after a days work am totally shattered, stiff, in pain,, arms are starting to hurt now.

I so want to just throw in the towel and give it up (well sometimes)..  . :-)

God only knows how this government are going to get more sick and disabled people back to work, its bloody hard out there.


devine63

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Re: Advising Patients About Work
« Reply #11 on: 27 Apr 2013 09:43PM »
Hi Sherbs

why wait for your manager?  Go ahead and contact your health & safety advisor or HR department or whoever does the workstation assessments.
regards, Deb

sherbs

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Re: Advising Patients About Work
« Reply #12 on: 27 Apr 2013 09:51PM »
Debs

I thought i had to go through the manager at work, as we were all asked who wanted a desk assessment, so i said i needed one, and it was left to the manger to sort it out.

I really didnt know i could go ahead and sort it out myself, otherwise i wold have dont it when i first moved to a different office and a different desk.

I will once again email the manager on monday, and if no luck will look into it myself, (the usual route for anything at work (nhs) is for the manager to approve things.

Can i just ring headoffice and ask who does the desk assessments ???


devine63

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Re: Advising Patients About Work
« Reply #13 on: 28 Apr 2013 12:40AM »
Yu can in the Uni where I work - I don't know about the NHS, but it is worth a try.   Often it is the Health and Safety people or Occupational Therapists - s worth checking with them first.
regards, Deb

Sunny Clouds

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Re: Advising Patients About Work
« Reply #14 on: 28 Apr 2013 01:36AM »
I feel a rant coming on...

Some years ago, at the height of my illness, I made a series of suicide attempts in quick succession.  I ended up first in the ED then in the bin.  I was discharged and had no job.  Because I'd lost my job, I wasn't getting SSP, and my IB took 2 months to come through, during which time my HB was suspended due to change of circumstances.

On seeing my psychiatrist in outpatients, he was scathing and unsympathetic and said that he couldn't see why I couldn't work.  Upset, I I asked him if he'd heard of health and safety and maybe my employers were worried I'd jump off the roof and land on someone.  Well, it fielded off some of the attack, but I wanted to crawl under a stone.

Imagine how different it might have been if he'd picked up the phone to my boss and said he thought I was fit for work.  He could have invited her to send a copy of my job description and sent back a report similar to a fit note.

But he didn't.  Nor did anyone help me with my benefits.  I just carried on seeing a rather shallow and lazy CPN with no common sense and no interest in seeing to it that I had the basics like food in my belly and a roof over my head.

It's all very well talking about the benefits of work, but already we have a situation whereby too many doctors don't find time to help with this sort of thing, and with the new contracting system for healthcare, does anyone here think this will improve at all?  I don't.

I think that with the right help I could have stayed in work.  I think that work could have been very positive for me.  But each time the health professionals supposedly looking after me undermined my confidence, they deepened my depression and made it harder to get back to work.

(I'm an obsessive problem-solver, so feel free to ignore any suggestions or solutions I offer, even if they sound terribly insistent.)