Author Topic: A good day to bury bad news?  (Read 7659 times)

JLR2

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A good day to bury bad news?
« on: 05 Dec 2013 10:47PM »
Storms over most of the country, Mandela dying terrific day to bury bad news and this government will make full use of it.

Mabelcat

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Re: A good day to bury bad news?
« Reply #1 on: 05 Dec 2013 10:53PM »
RIP Nelson Mandela, a truly great man.

JLR2

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Re: A good day to bury bad news?
« Reply #2 on: 05 Dec 2013 11:08PM »
Had he been British and living here he'd have died in prison. As I was typing this posting out I switched my TV from watching as I was a Para Handy DVD to BBC1 only to find that Question Time and This Week have been scrapped in order for the BBC to pay homage to Mr Mandela.

Look I'm sorry but he is dead, he'll be buried and no doubt most of the top political leaders will have a nice visit to make to South Africa but he was 94 what did the world expect? that he'd live forever?   How long will our media be in mourning for Mr Mandela weeks or months?  Will we now have daily up dating's on how the row within his relatives is going?  We had enough of that when he was thought to be dying a few months back.  I suppose this'll be a template for the reaction to the Queen's death, more time to bury bad news.

Sorry if I'm offending anyone but there are things being done by this government that impact far more directly on all of us than the death of Nelson Mandela. 

JLR2

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Re: A good day to bury bad news?
« Reply #3 on: 05 Dec 2013 11:19PM »
I tried checking the BBC's iplayer  and found that (in theory at least) QT is to be shown on BBC2 (not Scotland) so I'll watch it on my note book. Quite why it is not being shown on BBC2 Scotland I don't know, probably have some rubbish that they think we want to watch here, they usually do.

JLR2

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Re: A good day to bury bad news?
« Reply #4 on: 05 Dec 2013 11:36PM »
Now they've changed the time to 23.35, pardon my ignorance but was Mandela British President and nobody told me? I already have Mandela fatigue and his body is hardly cold. Hell alone knows how much more of our news coverage is going to be devoted to this president we never had.

wheelydad

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Re: A good day to bury bad news?
« Reply #5 on: 05 Dec 2013 11:47PM »
The BBC has a World News channel, a BBC1 news channel, that should be sufficient to report the passing of the greatly respected Nelson Mandela.

JLR2

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Re: A good day to bury bad news?
« Reply #6 on: 05 Dec 2013 11:50PM »
"The BBC has a World News channel, a BBC1 news channel, that should be sufficient to report the passing of the greatly respected Nelson Mandela''

Och naw that'd be too simple, maybe Cameron has ordered the BBC to swamp everyone with this flooding of their channels with stuff we've heard for what seems forever about Mandela. Everyone should have a full refund of their tv licence as it was paid to the BBC not South Africa's mourning channel.

JLR2

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Re: A good day to bury bad news?
« Reply #7 on: 05 Dec 2013 11:54PM »
Now QT's to be shown at 23.50 at this rate they'll have buried Mandela before it's shown, pillocks!

KizzyKazaer

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Re: A good day to bury bad news?
« Reply #8 on: 06 Dec 2013 08:17AM »
In the great scheme of things, I don't think it's really that big a deal for one late evening's TV schedule on one channel to be disrupted - Nelson Mandela was an important figure on the world stage who achieved great things for others through a long and painful struggle. 

Is there any particular 'buried bad news' (items of importance tucked away in less prominent areas of news bulletins) that you have in mind, JLR?

lankou

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Re: A good day to bury bad news?
« Reply #9 on: 06 Dec 2013 08:33AM »
In the great scheme of things, I don't think it's really that big a deal for one late evening's TV schedule on one channel to be disrupted -

The problem is it is not just one channel, it is blanket across the entire BBC. I have had to resort to Russia TV to avoid it.

JLR2

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Re: A good day to bury bad news?
« Reply #10 on: 06 Dec 2013 09:04AM »
Lankou this morning I'm having to watch Germany's ZDF channel to avoid hearing about Mandela's death.

Two things crossed my mind about this, first was the 'Perfect storm', Mandela's death, helicopter going through roof of pub, the Queen passing away and Vicky Beckham breaking a nail which would the BBC blanket cover?  Second, how many are going to crawl out the woodwork to attend and 'be seen to' attend Mandela's funeral, obviously it will not be accepted as a meaningful funeral unless the Blair's are there then there are the Beckham's perhaps with Vicky parading her latest funeral dress design maybe we'll have IDS leading a team from Atos who will claim they could have found Mandela some form of work they reckon he was fit for.
« Last Edit: 06 Dec 2013 10:14AM by JLR2 »

sickandtired

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Re: A good day to bury bad news?
« Reply #11 on: 06 Dec 2013 09:44AM »
One thing that I'd love the BBC to reflect on, but that there isn't a cat in Hell's chance of it doing.

I'd love it to try to remember what sort of organisation it was when people all over the World were battling against apartheid - a fearless, truth-seeking organisation that would stand up to anyone, and which couldn't be bought off.

Now its own nation is governed by a mob that is oppressing the weakest and muost vulnerable (no, it's not as bad as South Africa was, but I think you know what I mean) and the BBC either looks the other way, or joins in.

I bet the South African broadcasting organisations back in the apartheid era had a very similar 'hear no evil, speak no evil' stance to the one the BBC has today.

oldtone27

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Re: A good day to bury bad news?
« Reply #12 on: 06 Dec 2013 09:46AM »
RIP Nelson Mandela.

Undoubtedly he was a great man and probably the only one who could have prevented South Africa degenerating into turmoil following apartheid, so he merits a reasonable amount of coverage on the news. But, not the saturation that the BBC has given.

The World Service programming was completely abandoned for a recap on his achievements which consisted of repeating the same clips and talking heads ad nauseam. The content could have been compressed to 10 minutes in each hour with no loss of coverage.

Similarly the Today program had saturation coverage with virtually nothing about any other topics. Ditto BBC Breakfast.  I even feel a bit sorry for George Osborne having his moment of glory usurped. No I don't really.

I do wonder if the BBC journalists actually think what they are saying. One WS reporter said Mandela's death was a great shock. No it wasn't. It was entirely expected just not the precise time. Otherwise it was just a string of platitudes.

Like JLR2 I anticipate totally overblown and continual eulogising as is the BBC's custom on such occasions. They just do not have a sense of proportion.

seegee

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Re: A good day to bury bad news?
« Reply #13 on: 06 Dec 2013 10:49AM »
He was 95 years old & had been severely ill for some months with a respiratory disease, so his death shouldn't be a shock to anyone who hadn't formed the view that he was immortal. 

Cutting into programmes already on air to make a short announcement that he has died was fine as many people would want to know; stopping the programmes completely seemed rather over-the-top. 
I was listening to In Our Time, then at 9:45pm I was told I could listen via computer (if I wanted to get out of bed to use the computer... maybe I'll listen today).  What would have been lost if they'd made a 10-second announcement then gone into detail during the 45-minute news programme at 10pm?  The announcement could have included "go to our website or news channels for more about Nelson Mandela, who has died today", so those who really needed to read/ hear about him immediately could do that while others could wait a few more minutes. 

It will be a sad time for his family although it was expected to happen soon.  There really is no need for the rest of the world (outside South Africa) to treat it like a global catastrophe though. 
If news outlets spent more time on genuine global issues like war, poverty, poor access to healthcare & too few children in school in many countries there might be some progress towards lessening them.  I expect Mandela would have liked that.


Prabhakari

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Re: A good day to bury bad news?
« Reply #14 on: 06 Dec 2013 02:47PM »
Countless numbers of living beings are dying and being born, in an infinite universe.
May they all find happiness.



The B.B.C. did find a couple of minutes to mention the floods.
This was on the Today Programme.



Nastier things might be happening in the world; in regard to China and its territorial claims.
There is an American Author, Dale Brown. He used to fly fighters for the U.S.A.F. Since then, he has written a series of books, based on what might happen in the world; much like some have wondered what might have happened, had Hitler won.

I have found one of his books where China is disputing control of some Islands off its coast. China has a military coup, and the president becomes 'ill', being removed for medical treatment. Meanwhile, the Chinese People's Liberation Army takes over, and begins attacking targets. This includes a small nuclear depth charge that destroys a Vietnamese submarine, among other aggressive acts.
The U.S. moves closer to war with China.

Truth is often strange. At the moment, the U.S. is facing up to renewed Chinese aggression with regard to the islands. If the Chinese military were to instigate attacks on targets it could lead to a military confrontation with America.
Our beloved leader is doing his best to tie us close to China, with nuclear power stations and railways and probably many other projects.
What will Britain do if things get worse? Will they have to support China, and forget the so-called special relationship?
Bless 'em all, bless 'em all,
The long and the short and the tall.