Author Topic: The end of Britain as we know it? (May upset some readers.)  (Read 5051 times)

AccessOfficer

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"Warning what you are about to read is controversial and may be alarming to some; reader discretion is advised."


"Britain is about to be flattened by a tidal wave of debt. It doesn’t matter if you vote Conservative, Liberal, Labour, UKIP – or for no party at all. The facts are the facts.
 
Two and a half years ago, when the Coalition government formed, we were already in a huge amount of debt. In fact, the previous government had left the country sinking under £700 billion’s worth.

The Coalition has spent the last two years desperately and very publically trying to get our finances in order. We’ve had an “austerity” budget. We’ve had tax hikes. We’ve had “the cuts”.
But for all that, our national debt is still growing at an incredible rate.

Despite David Cameron’s talk of “austerity”, he’s going to add an estimated £700 billion to the national debt in just five years. That’s more than Tony Blair and Gordon Brown added to the national debt in eleven years. It’s more than every British government of the past 100 years put together.

The fact is, when you look at our finances as a whole, the Coalition isn’t cutting anything. State spending is going up… our national debt is going up… and our interest payments are going up.

By the next general election in 2015, our national debt is estimated to stand at almost £1.4 trillion. It’s clear: our public finances are in an enormous mess. Anyone can see that. And to some extent, some politicians will admit it.

But add in our financial, personal and private debts… and an even darker picture emerges.

Compared to the size of our economy, Britain is now one of the most heavily indebted countries in the Western world. That’s official. Our total debts stand at more than FIVE TIMES what our entire economy is worth."

http://info.moneyweek.com/urgent-bulletins/the-end-of-britain/?infinity=gaw~DISPL%2BSPCFC%2BThe%20End%20Of%20Britain~DISPL%2BSPCFC%2BThe%20End%20Of%20Britain%2BPL%20guardian.co.uk%2BKW%20%20Debt%2BTXT~20304508029~placement:www.publicfinance.co.uk~c&gclid=CKHF7qr27bgCFYPHtAodOQoABg

Just thought I would cheer everyone up a bit.

Regards
AO

Sunny Clouds

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It was only recently that I read that every single country in the world is in debt.  So who do they owe the money to?  Well it can't all be to other countries, can it?

There are two explanations. 

Firstly, debt can be counted more than once.  Once you put individuals and companies into the equation as well as countries, it all becomes more complicated and you may have A owing B who owes C who owes A and all three debts are counted even though the bottom line is that there's only one sum involved going round in circles.

Secondly, we all know that we owe banks and a mega rich people and corporations a hell of a lot, but interest and profit are the biggies.  We don't have to owe so much.  If enough countries got together and did something about usury, it could make a big difference.

It's not as if people don't want it, but now think of yourself as a big political leader.  With a few exceptions, you're there because you want power and frequently also money.  You don't get that power without money and unless you're very rich to begin with so you can buy your own power, you need backers and they have their own interests.

What's needed is a world revolution over financial exploitation but IMO it won't happen.

I said something on another site that got me ostracised.

At any one point in time, a few countries will be in power in the world.  In practice, that means a few corporations and individuals and politicians.  If we're lucky, they get what they want nicely, but history shows they often don't but we don't like to acknowledge that, particularly if it's us or our friends.  (I.e. almost-gone British empire and current American empire.)

Let me give an everyday example.  We're all familiar with the name Cadbury.  The famous Bournville chocolate is named after not only a factory but a village built by the quaker Cadbury family, who believed in looking after their workers.  If you have occasion to visit it (and I know someone who lives there so sometimes I do take a day trip there) you'll find it's still lovely, if a bit quirky such as being an alcohol-sale free zone.

What isn't so often mentioned is that whilst the Cadbury's looked after their workers in Bournville in a way others in Birmingham envied, and whilst they endowed many charitable foundations still helping many people, they did so by using ingredients made with slave labour.  We, as British, benefitted from their benevolence and saw Cadbury as a name to be fond of (and there are some very nice people in the Cadbury family), in its heyday it was a byword for slavery, exploitation and cruelty in the places where their ingredients were grown.

When I first read about the role of the CIA in putting Pinochet in power, it made me stop and think.  When I read of politicians in America and Britain praising him, it made me stop and think.

America is powerful.  Other countries, where their is power just in their own region, may rise up to be more internationally powerful.  Our own power is fading.  America is not nice everywhere any more than we were and nor are most of the other potential rivals.  You don't become an empire by being nice to everyone.

So we'd better hope we stay on the right side of America or whichever country becomes more powerful, e.g. China.  That also means staying on the right side of their financial backers. 
(I'm an obsessive problem-solver, so feel free to ignore any suggestions or solutions I offer, even if they sound terribly insistent.)

TimRegency

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I understand that 21 trillion pounds is stashed in the British Virgin Islands.

Confiscate it.

Sunny Clouds

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It would set an interesting precedent.  I'm not convinced it wouldn't create more problems than it would solve.
(I'm an obsessive problem-solver, so feel free to ignore any suggestions or solutions I offer, even if they sound terribly insistent.)

TimRegency

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It'd wind up the right people, though.

Fizzbw

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I think this has as much credibility as the 13,000 needless deaths or Stafford being the devils hospital. I.e. it's statistics used wrong and many times and generally misunderstood.

Fx

bubble

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Look what happened. In Iceland

devine63

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and look what is happening now in Iceland ...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2008%E2%80%932011_Icelandic_financial_crisis 

they had a crisis, but somehow the world didn't end ....


I was interested in the article posted by AO, so I have passed it to www.fullfact.org to see if they will look at it
regards, Deb

bubble

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Debs Yep that's what I meant, if they can do it.
So can the rest and no country will owe.
Its all made up figures moved around anyway  >biggergrin<

AccessOfficer

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Hi Deb,
Many thanks for passing the article on to Full Fact.

I must admit that when I read it, it upset me quite a bit as the people who wrote the article sound so credible because of their previous advice to their members that turned out they had made the right predictions.

Best wishes
AO

Fizzbw

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Sunny Clouds

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Re: The end of Britain as we know it? (May upset some readers.)
« Reply #11 on: 10 Aug 2013 01:58PM »
 >thumbsup<
(I'm an obsessive problem-solver, so feel free to ignore any suggestions or solutions I offer, even if they sound terribly insistent.)

bulekingfisher

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Re: The end of Britain as we know it? (May upset some readers.)
« Reply #12 on: 10 Aug 2013 05:41PM »
Hello A.O

The name Cammoron sound Scotish so have we got an ill-legal Asslum Seeker in No 10 trying to do what Robort the Bruce tried to do + bring England to it's knee's + destroy the Country

starsmurf

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Re: The end of Britain as we know it? (May upset some readers.)
« Reply #13 on: 10 Aug 2013 10:13PM »
Hello A.O

The name Cammoron sound Scotish so have we got an ill-legal Asslum Seeker in No 10 trying to do what Robort the Bruce tried to do + bring England to it's knee's + destroy the Country

David Cameron is about as Scottish as the Duke of Edinburgh.  Please don't even think of associating that vile person with my country unless you wish to have a lot of very angry Scottish people on your doorstep.  With Claymores  >biggrin<

On a serious note, there is no such thing as an illegal asylum seeker.  An asylum seeker is someone who asks a country for a safe place to live.  They're asking for the right to live here because they are being persecuted in their home country and would be in danger if they were returned.  For example, there are asylum seekers from Zimbabwe who are in danger because they opposed Robert Mugabe.  If they are returned, they are certain to be arrested as "British spies", imprisoned and tortured. 

An illegal immigrant is someone who did not declare their entry to the country, eg they were smuggled in.  Please don't mix the two up, asylum seekers are people who have gone through horrific ordeals, they've seen family members murdered, they've been tortured and/or they've been raped by the police or military.

Also, remember that the Prime Minister doesn't have to be English.  They can be Scottish, Welsh or Northern Irish.  We're part of this country too, we get a say and we get the right to run it.

Unfortunately, the views of some English people were made clear after Princess Diana died.  Instead of allowing the family some peace and privacy in which to support her two young sons, with wide open spaces where William and Harry could be alone and walk or cry or scream, there was a public campaign to get the Queen to return to London.  One person even said "She's back in the country, where she belongs".  The usual English-centric rubbish.  In the circumstances, it was unforgivable.
Look carefully at the avatar, note what's barely visible in the gap in the rings.  I've highlighted it for you.

Sunny Clouds

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Re: The end of Britain as we know it? (May upset some readers.)
« Reply #14 on: 11 Aug 2013 01:09AM »
I'd just like to pick you up on a small point.  I think you are mistaking asylum seekers for people who are necessarily entitled to asylum. 

Just as not everyone who says they are disabled is disabled, so not everyone who claims asylum is genuinely entitled to it.

In saying that, I am not suggesting that those who seek asylum but are shown not to be entitled to it form a high proportion of asylum seekers, merely that seeking asylum is not the same as being entitled to it.

Probably the biggest group that gives rise to dissatisfaction over their claims are those who claim asylum here having travelled through safe countries, often countries with a lower density of population than ours.

In theory, virtually the only people legally able to get asylum in this country will be those that have come by plane, because with very few exceptions for particular individuals the countries which they will have had to depart the continent from to reach the UK by sea will be safe countries.

We do grant asylum to people not legally entitled under international treaty as part of our EU obligations whereby we have agreed to take our share of refugees to the EU, but we do not have to do so and can veto this provision at any time if we so wish.

I think that it is a good thing that we are a safe haven, however, I admit to having been irritated sometimes by people who use claims to asylum when they are in reality economic migrants as they have passed through safe countries where they could get asylum.

I remember seeing a documentary about Sangatte and seeing a lot of young men from Afghanistan and feeling angry.  We're over there trying to sort out the problems while they're coming here.  I wanted to shout 'Go home, put a uniform on and fight for your own country and your own families!'

But like I say, I wouldn't wish to suggest that those that abuse the asylum system are representative.

Sadly, with global warming I think the time will come at which there are so many hungry and desperate people heading north that we will stop direct flights to many countries.  I hope that that will not be in my lifetime.

But back to my original point - seeking asylum isn't the same as being entitled to it. 
(I'm an obsessive problem-solver, so feel free to ignore any suggestions or solutions I offer, even if they sound terribly insistent.)