Author Topic: Ten level 60m long wheelchair ramp  (Read 3648 times)

gus

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« Last Edit: 14 Feb 2014 11:11PM by SunshineMeadows »

oldtone27

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Re: Ten level 60m long wheelchair ramp
« Reply #1 on: 14 Feb 2014 09:37AM »
This does seem to be at the extreme end of 'reasonable adjustments'.

Some more pictures which give a better impression in the Daily Excess

http://www.express.co.uk/news/uk/459535/Mum-s-fury-after-council-WIPES-OUT-front-garden-to-install-40k-disabled-ramp-for-daughter

I can't help thinking there should be a simpler solution. A chair lift may have been more appropriate but perhaps that would be too prone to vandals.

Perhaps it was not the ideal house for access in the first place.

lankou

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Re: Ten level 60m long wheelchair ramp
« Reply #2 on: 14 Feb 2014 09:42AM »


Perhaps it was not the ideal house for access in the first place.

Precisely.

Dic Penderyn

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Re: Ten level 60m long wheelchair ramp
« Reply #3 on: 14 Feb 2014 10:51AM »
I wonder what their Postman/Lady thinks about it. Deliveries in general may be a bit problematic.
Be careful in what you wish for, God has a sense of humour

oldtone27

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Re: Ten level 60m long wheelchair ramp
« Reply #4 on: 14 Feb 2014 10:59AM »
As far as I can see the original steps are still in place so deliveries may be not more of a problem.

Dic Penderyn

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Re: Ten level 60m long wheelchair ramp
« Reply #5 on: 14 Feb 2014 11:14AM »
Ah yes I see that now though am unsure from the picture whether the steps connect to the front door or the rear access.
Be careful in what you wish for, God has a sense of humour

oldtone27

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Re: Ten level 60m long wheelchair ramp
« Reply #6 on: 14 Feb 2014 11:34AM »
Yes, its not totally clear in the finished arrangement, but the original shot shows the flight of steps do access the front door step. I wouldn't think it necessary for the ramp to interfere with this. That doesn't mean it hasn't.

Still looks overkill to me.

Sunny Clouds

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Re: Ten level 60m long wheelchair ramp
« Reply #7 on: 14 Feb 2014 02:25PM »
Obviously, different news sources are giving us different accounts of the sequence.  However, the mother appears (according to some reports) to have accepted the property as suitable and then to have said it wasn't.  If that is so, I have limited sympathy.  I would be  interested to know whether there were any ground-floor properties available on the private market locally.  I appreciate that there are those that take a response like that as like suggesting people should be turfed out in the street, but there are millions of people living in private rented accommodation and except for emergencies or people needing certain types of supported housing, there is actually no obligation to live in social housing, only a preference.

I'm going to niggle even more, but I am biased.  I'm going to tell you the story of a couple I know.

They are elderly and disabled but their impairments don't include an inability to climb stairs. 

They lived in a ground floor flat but got huffy over thinking a neighbour was a drug dealer but never suggested there was any unpleasant behaviour, damage to the communal areas or personal danger, just a suspicion of drugs being dealt through a window.

So they insisted their housing association moved them.  They waited a long time and I said why not go private and they seemed offended.  Ok, they wanted security of tenure, but what price that if you want to move away from your neighbours?  I had a house of my own,  but still had to move sharpish when I had neighbour trouble.

Well, they whinged and fussed and played the disability card and were offered a little bungalow.  It's lovely and is surrounded by other little bungalows with green open spaces and trees etc.  There are a lot of people wanting one.

Then they moved in and the complaints started.  They insisted the HA rip out the wet room and install a bath.  They didn't want the rails.   A door was hung 'the wrong way'.  They didn't like the porch.  They didn't want storage heaters, they wanted radiators.  It was too cold.  The nearest bus didn't go frequently enough.  The next nearest bus was too far away.  They didn't like the neighbour because he is  mentally ill and wanders around at night.  (No suggestion he's a peeping tom or aggressive/violent, just that he's a 'loony'.  Indeed, they went so far as to track down information about his past to see whether they could find anything to persuade the HA to chuck him out.)

In due course, they asked the HA to move them.  Well, they're not exactly a priority, are they?  They've taken a disability-adapted bungalow that is in very short supply on the basis of being disabled then had pretty much all the adaptations unadapted.  (I would see it no differently if they'd taken a family home unless that was what the HA had a surfeit of.)

The HA has other properties, but they've refused and I think they think I'm being very, very unkind when I say they don't actually have to wait several years for another HA property because they're in a built-up area so it's not a question of rent a HA/council property or buy an expensive house, there are loads of rental properties.

So I'm biased.  I don't assume that when someone says they have no choice but to live in HA accommodation that they do, and I tend to be unsympathetic where someone insists on a particular property (as appears to be the case here), insists on adaptations (as appears to be the case here ) and then complains about it all.

Incidentally, I've also done a very quick online search for properties in the area.  Within a couple of minutes I'd identified a ground floor two bed flat with access pretty level (not up a hill/bank). 

And yes, as someone in private rented accommodation, I'm aware the waiting lists for social housing are massive and so in short, it seems to me that they had various choices.  They could have rented something suitable privately but they chose to insist on social housing.  They insisted on that particular property.  They now complain about the adaptations (that I'd like to bet there are people out there who would be grateful for).

Gosh, I'm not feeling nice today, am I?
(I'm an obsessive problem-solver, so feel free to ignore any suggestions or solutions I offer, even if they sound terribly insistent.)

oldtone27

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Re: Ten level 60m long wheelchair ramp
« Reply #8 on: 14 Feb 2014 03:28PM »
Sunny, I accept your point about some people taking a mile when given an inch and not being grateful, but it is possible to simply make a mistake also.

Actually I don't think the family in question are ungrateful but have found a problem with the councils solution which is use of the ramp by local skateboarders.  They asked for a gate for security but that cannot be provided for 'elf and safety'. apparently it would hinge over the pavement. Sliding gate perhaps?

I also understand that the family moved in a four years ago and I think felt they could manage the steps.  Maybe the little girl has grown so the steps are more difficult to manage?

I still think the council's solution is bizarre.

Dic Penderyn

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Re: Ten level 60m long wheelchair ramp
« Reply #9 on: 14 Feb 2014 04:02PM »
How many children do they have I think at least two as Katie is a twin maybe a two bedroom home is not suitable also the private housing sector can be fairly expensive and it could be most private landlords may not be happy to provide adaptions. I also rent privately btw. We only have the bare bones of their story we do not know their complete history or why they made the choices they did only that they must have believed they were the best choices for them at the time.
Be careful in what you wish for, God has a sense of humour

seegee

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Re: Ten level 60m long wheelchair ramp
« Reply #10 on: 14 Feb 2014 04:52PM »
3 or 4 lengths of chain with padlocks would deter the skateboarders (probably not very likely they'd come with bolt-cutters to do a bit of criminal damage, if they did then that'd be a police matter).  It would take an extra couple of minutes when the girl using her wheelchair was going out to open & re-close the padlocks. 
The rest of the family could continue to use the steps if she was not with them.  I assume mum may go out when the girls are at school for instance. 
Surely that wouldn't cost much?  Cheaper than a gate and lower maintenance. >confusedgif<

auntieCtheM

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Re: Ten level 60m long wheelchair ramp
« Reply #11 on: 14 Feb 2014 05:44PM »
It seems to me that when the child was younger she would have been in a pushchair or be carried, like any other child.  Now that she is older they would like her to have some independence and not be trapped in the house until someone could assist her.  That is reasonable.  I think that the newspapers have made a mountain out of a molehill.

A gate could hinge on the house side, and it also could be set back a few feet from the pavement so that the chair would be fully on the path before the gate is opened.  That would help with access and deter the skateboarders a little.  Surely the Council has an urban design team that could think this solution up.

devine63

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Re: Ten level 60m long wheelchair ramp
« Reply #12 on: 15 Feb 2014 12:35AM »
WHatever the story for the family, the council have made a ridiculous decision on the actual ramp.   In a circumstance like that it would be better (and almost certainly cheaper!!!) to install an outdoor platform lift - they would need professional advice, but my guess is that if they cut a path to the right spot the lift could go alongside the stairs.
regards, Deb

Sunny Clouds

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Re: Ten level 60m long wheelchair ramp
« Reply #13 on: 15 Feb 2014 01:21AM »
They'd have had to shore up the ground either side, which would surely be expensive?  And there would be maintenance costs and if the local kids play on a ramp, heaven only knows what they'd do on a lift.
(I'm an obsessive problem-solver, so feel free to ignore any suggestions or solutions I offer, even if they sound terribly insistent.)

devine63

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Re: Ten level 60m long wheelchair ramp
« Reply #14 on: 15 Feb 2014 11:30AM »
outdoor lifts have security settings to prevent them being used by anyone who shouldn't have access, Sunny.
Yes they would have to reinforce the bank, but that's a relatively straightforward task.  And a simple lift would be a lot less of an eyesore as well as much more efficient than such a long ramp.
regards, Deb