Author Topic: "Attack of the 'feline ninja'"  (Read 9180 times)

starsmurf

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Re: "Attack of the 'feline ninja'"
« Reply #15 on: 14 Dec 2013 08:06PM »
Gosh, that must have been very frightening for the lady.

I must admit I would be very scared to keep the cat, or anyone else.  As others have said if a dog had acted that way it would have been put down.

My sister once had a devil of a cat, it would jump and claw at you any chance it got, it got me a few times, and the poor vet, !!

Sadly, it sounds like your sister's cat was never properly introduced to people as a kitten ("socialised" is the proper term for it).  It was either scared that people would attack or it was always trying to play-fight as humans had encourage it to do as a kitten.  If it play-fought with another cat like that, it would get a sharp nip to tell it it'd gone too far.

The other reason could be mistreatment, if it was a rescue cat, or pain, as Auntie suggests.

I've had this 'attack' problem with rescued cats.  It can take them up to 6 months to realise that I am not something to attack.  It is all down to their background, poor things.

One I remember was particularly vicious if I accidentally touched her back legs.  I realised quite quickly what the trouble was, which the vet pinpointed.  The cat had kidney problems and was in pain all the time.  So when I touched her painful places the only thing she could do is take a good swipe at me with claws out.  We eventually got that sorted out and she became much more docile.  Meanwhile I had to cope with a lot of deep scratches and bites.

So maybe the OP cat story shows that the cat had something wrong with it.

I've read a lot of case-studies where pain is the reason behind cats being aggressive or grumpy/moody/unsociable.  Cats don't whine or show they're in pain, they're stoics.  However, it does make them aggressive, as they're frightened due to being vulnerable to attack.  As cats may be on their own in the wild, if they're weakened in any way, they're prey for dogs and other animals.

I saw a BBC programme about a vet practice in Wales.  One of the episodes featured a cat that had a chronic problem with its urinary tract.  They explained that this was the last option: either put the cat to sleep or a penilectomy (I put it that way so the men in the audience won't faint).

The owner of the cat talked about what a moody, aggressive cat he was.  She was covered in scratches but was adamant that she wasn't going to return him to the shelter she got him from.

The day after surgery, the vet was able to sit in the cat's pen and stroke him, you could hear the cat purring away.  During the follow-up, the owner talked about what a lovely, affectionate cat he was now, always on her lap and loving his cuddles.

It just shows how many "nasty" cats could simply be lovely cats that are in terrible pain.
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seegee

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Re: "Attack of the 'feline ninja'"
« Reply #16 on: 14 Dec 2013 08:14PM »
My brother used to have an unpredictable cat who swiped at people who came in reach sometimes (but stayed in a roomful of people when he could have gone to a quiet room easily), while at other times he'd go to be stroked (also in a roomful of the same people). 
I know a dog locally who is very unpredictable, friendly one minute & snapping at the same person's hand 2 minutes later; he's never aggressive with his owner apparently but can't be trusted by anyone else.

I get on fine with most dogs & cats; dogs are definitely more demanding to live with though as most cats can take themselves out for a walk. 

I haven't had a pet animal (though have lived in homes with cat or dog at different times, they "belonged" to someone else in the house) since the household budgie died when I was 11 - he was older than me by a year or two so I can't claim him as "mine" though I had been the one cleaning his cage & checking food/ water most often for the last couple of years of his life.  He was very friendly & not in the slightest unpredictable. >biggrin<
« Last Edit: 14 Dec 2013 08:49PM by seegee »

starsmurf

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Re: "Attack of the 'feline ninja'"
« Reply #17 on: 14 Dec 2013 08:18PM »
Starry, thanks for that explanation, I haven't heard anything so clear and concise before. I have been a 'cat person' all my life but didn't realise the grooming/dominance stuff - it makes a lot of sense, especially of Cleo's behaviour  >biggrin<

Glad to help Hurty!

Cat behaviour is a fascinating area.  I hadn't realised a lot of that stuff before I started reading about it.  I did see the grooming behaviour in my previous cat's kittens though.  Sometimes one would keep grooming just a little too long and get a tap on the head to tell him to stop it!  I felt a bit guilty for how I'd stroked the cat before and for accusing her of being grumpy for swiping at me. >blush<

The fact I found most surprising was the fact that cats prefer their water in a seperate place to their food.  That's why cats will drink out of your glass of water instead of their own bowl.  They also prefer flowing water and, as they can taste water(!), they also prefer it filtered.

I got a water fountain for Titan that filters the water and keeps it flowing.  It's silent and costs pennies to run.  It does encourage him to drink much more.  The vet told me that he is less likely to end up with kidney problems as a result.

With my previous cat, I thought it was the glass she liked, so she had her own glass of water.  I only drink water.  When we went over to stay with my parents at Christmas, she was in the living room with my family while I was lying down.  I then heard a shout from my mum.  When I went through she was angry and said, "you've not given Fudge any water!  She's so thirsty, she's just tried to drink my glass of Diet Coke!" >lol<

It took a few minutes to explain.  Meanwhile Fudge was slightly cross-eyed and still wiping her nose after getting bubbles up it. >biggrin<

< Edit to correct spelling >
« Last Edit: 14 Dec 2013 09:03PM by starsmurf »
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Hurtyback

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Re: "Attack of the 'feline ninja'"
« Reply #18 on: 14 Dec 2013 08:53PM »
Yes, I know that cats' water should be in a different place from their food. Cleo has a dish of water in the room where she is shut overnight but they have a water fountain in the lounge and both make good use of it.


Our previous 2 cats came to us when they were very young (much too young, actually), so they didn't always exhibit typical feline behaviour. We didn't have Alfie until he was aprox 10 months and he wasn't neutered at that stage, so he is a very different character from Chivvy who came to me at 6 weeks and was neutered at 6 months!


Edited typo

Defying Gravity

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Re: "Attack of the 'feline ninja'"
« Reply #19 on: 15 Dec 2013 02:45PM »
I try to take my cue from the cats, when they're together they groom each other a bit and then either go to sleep or walk away. So if they sit on me I give them a bit of fuss so they know they're welcome and then leave  them be to settle down. Luca won't tolerate more than that anyway, he doesn't enjoy being stroked.

NeuralgicNeurotic

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Re: "Attack of the 'feline ninja'"
« Reply #20 on: 15 Dec 2013 07:33PM »
Quote
've read a lot of case-studies where pain is the reason behind cats being aggressive or grumpy/moody/unsociable.  Cats don't whine or show they're in pain, they're stoics.  However, it does make them aggressive, as they're frightened due to being vulnerable to attack.  As cats may be on their own in the wild, if they're weakened in any way, they're prey for dogs and other animals.

Exactly - which is the reason why, if your cat is suddenly exhibiting aggressive behaviour, the first thing you need to do is to get them checked out by a vet for any signs of injury or illness.

Jockice

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Re: "Attack of the 'feline ninja'"
« Reply #21 on: 16 Dec 2013 05:13PM »
The dearly-departed Pongo (gone a year tomorrow) used to regularly attack me. Not to the extent that woman's cat did, but I used to regularly have scratches and bites on me. Apparently she'd been treated badly and then abandoned outside the vets at the age of about a year, so I think she'd been left a bit disturbed. She could also be very nice too, but you could never really tell when she was going to turn.

Lotte on the other hand is a really sweet, affectionate little moggie, although she did manage to cut my nose by clawing it a couple of days after I got her. A totally different kettle of fish.

Dic Penderyn

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Re: "Attack of the 'feline ninja'"
« Reply #22 on: 16 Dec 2013 06:40PM »
Yes give your cat a different Kettle of fish every day and you will have no problem.
Be careful in what you wish for, God has a sense of humour

Jockice

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Re: "Attack of the 'feline ninja'"
« Reply #23 on: 16 Dec 2013 06:55PM »
I'd pour it all over her if I got the chance. While I wasn't looking, out of an entire room to lie on, she's chosen the trousers I was going to wear tomorrow. Git.

AndMac

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Re: "Attack of the 'feline ninja'"
« Reply #24 on: 17 Dec 2013 03:23AM »
Just to clarify, I don't expect dogs to be my servants, nor would I ever. They work alongside Man in many different and useful roles.

 Equally, lovely cats like Titan and my brothers late Burman Oscar provide great service as companions.

My dog was obedience trained to a level that most dogs are not so was far more of a pleasure to own than most as she was so obedient (Trained by her former owner,  kept up to scratch by me, she was a rescue dog but he was unable to keep her).

I completely agree with the theory that a cat is often vicious because it is ill/in pain. A good friend had a cat that limped from being a kitten (she got in with the cows and was stepped on) . She had incredible mood swings and I'm sure that pain contributed.  Dogs are a bit easier to read when it comes to illness.
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Yvette

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Re: "Attack of the 'feline ninja'"
« Reply #25 on: 17 Dec 2013 12:45PM »
Condolences about Pongo.  >hugs<

My much loved Ebby has been gone a year next week.   :-(

NeuralgicNeurotic

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Re: "Attack of the 'feline ninja'"
« Reply #26 on: 17 Dec 2013 01:07PM »
 Yvette and Jockice >bighugs<

starsmurf

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Re: "Attack of the 'feline ninja'"
« Reply #27 on: 17 Dec 2013 03:27PM »
I'd pour it all over her if I got the chance. While I wasn't looking, out of an entire room to lie on, she's chosen the trousers I was going to wear tomorrow. Git.

She's trying to give you confidence, Jockice. >biggrin< 

Cats gain confidence from their "group smell" so she wants you to feel all safe and happy when you go out into the big bad world.  In case you have to fight any other cats or something...
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starsmurf

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Re: "Attack of the 'feline ninja'"
« Reply #28 on: 17 Dec 2013 03:29PM »
Condolences about Pongo.  >hugs<

My much loved Ebby has been gone a year next week.   :-(

 >bighugs< >bighugs< >bighugs< >bighugs< >bighugs< to both

Losing a cat is awful.  Losing a cat at Christmas is even worse.
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Yvette

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Re: "Attack of the 'feline ninja'"
« Reply #29 on: 17 Dec 2013 04:07PM »
I've got photos of Ebby (on his own and with Ivy) on my landing so I see him every time I use the stairlift.

Ebby's ashes are in a lovely carved wood box in my sitting room near where I sit. 

I still get very upset about losing him. 

The Vet staff loved him too.  His vet used to cuddle him in her arms like a baby and he loved it!  She said only a couple of weeks that they still talk about him, which is super.