Author Topic: Updated DWP guidance for people with mental health problems  (Read 375 times)


Sunny Clouds

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Thank you for that - I lost my mobility component on the DLA to PIP migration, and after two mandatory reconsiderations, focussed mostly round points for hearing, I got my PIP, just three days before the government backtracked over its changes withdrawing mobility element from lots of people with mental health problems.

That was back in 2018. Why is all this taking so long?  Expletive, expletive, expletive!

So thank you again for the link.
(I'm an obsessive problem-solver, so feel free to ignore any suggestions or solutions I offer, even if they sound terribly insistent.)

KizzyKazaer

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On DLA, I received the lower rate mobility component with no trouble at all, so when I was denied under the PIP criteria, it struck me as a very mean-spirited attempt by the Government to save money - not to mention the unsaid implication that mental health problems were somehow lesser than physical (so bored with that)

I hope the DWP do the right thing for all those out there who've lost out because of the original PIP decision-making process.

Fiz

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Hopefully a good number of people will be getting their backdated payments! 

The problem with mental health problems is it takes a supreme amount of mental effort to fill in forms and fight for your rights and there will be many people who deserve the backdated and ongoing payments but just don't have the spoons to deal with it.

Sunny Clouds

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The problem with mental health problems is it takes a supreme amount of mental effort to fill in forms and fight for your rights and there will be many people who deserve the backdated and ongoing payments but just don't have the spoons to deal with it.
That's one of the overlapping catch-22s of many disabling conditions.  And of course if you can cope with filling the forms in, it can be used as evidence you're just fine.   :f_steam:

Other pitfalls include any sort of relapsing-remitting condition, because if you're assessed on a good day, you're sunk, just as if you're seen by neighbours who don't know you well only or mostly on good days, you're sunk in terms of your reputation.

I think it's well-illustrated by bipolar disorder.  Gone manic?  No problem, you're just very happy or busy making up for lost time, which you must have lost by pretending to be ill.  Not seen for a while, or seen out whilst low and unable to put a face on it, but not looking stereotypically depressed?  Just showing signs of having realised people know you're faking it.

Ditto conditions that vary year to year or hour to hour.
(I'm an obsessive problem-solver, so feel free to ignore any suggestions or solutions I offer, even if they sound terribly insistent.)

Sunny Clouds

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Benefits and Work has put out a call for people who think the review process has been applied unfairly to them.

For details, link to DPAC (Disabled People Against the Cuts) website.

DPAC - info re PIP mobility review legal challenge
(I'm an obsessive problem-solver, so feel free to ignore any suggestions or solutions I offer, even if they sound terribly insistent.)